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Why do we need specialist logistics for collections?

As part of the exciting refurbishment and redisplay of two of our Galleries, Constantine Ltd was asked to move the existing collection of objects on display. We asked Sascha Hurrell from Constantine why we need specialists to help move our collections.

Constantine Ltd has remained a family business for over four generations. With our longstanding heritage and expertise in fine art logistics, we hold the necessary knowledge and skills to move many intriguing objects that included the striking Uvol headdresses from New Britain, the largest island of the Bismarck Archipelago.

  • Constantine moving our objects, Packing objects, Constantine Ltd
    Packing objects, Constantine Ltd

The most well-renowned object the team handled was the famous painted papier-mâché figure of Kali, the mother goddess, which was part of Frederick Horniman’s original collection.

Constantine’s Technical Manager, Laurence Burley, could see what a unique project this was, “The objects that we packed were varied in size, weight and age, which proved quite challenging. This was especially true of the headdresses and masks, which were designed to be ceremonial and so not made to last. Our technicians worked very closely with the Horniman Museum and Gardens staff, and our relationship was essential to ensure we completed the work on time to the highest standard”.

What happens when a museum wants to move or change a display? It is vital to have specialists with relevant skills and expertise to complete the task efficiently with the upmost care and attention to detail.

  • Constantine moving our objects, Making sure objects are safe for transportation, Constantine Ltd
    Making sure objects are safe for transportation, Constantine Ltd

Before any artwork or object can be moved, it needs to be assessed by the technical team in charge of the project. Here are 10 factors that need to be taken into consideration for each object:

Fragility

If the objects are fragile they will require additional preparation from the museum team and expert technicians, to ensure the safety of the piece for future generations. In some cases, bespoke equipment and forms of support must be created to complete the task. The structure of an object determines the method of handling and moving.

Weight

This will determine how many technicians are required and if the object can be moved manually, or whether a lifting operator is required with specialist lifting equipment.

Age

Knowing the history of an item is crucial in determining how it should be moved. In many cases, objects could be on display in the same location for many years, so any movement could unsettle the object and may cause lasting damage. The museum’s own archives can be an invaluable source of information.

Assessing location

Before any work can begin, the Technical Manager must confirm what part of the building the objects are currently placed and whether it is easily accessible. They must work out how the objects can be removed from its current position. Knowing what existing lighting is available in each room is incredibly important when deciding how any item or collection is moved. In many cases, additional conversation lighting is required to ensure the safe movement of the objects.

Destination

It may sound obvious, but a big part of the technician’s job is to assess where the objects are being moved to. The final destination can affect the quote of the project, the timescale, the number of staff and crate preparation.

  • Constantine moving our objects, Removing objects from the galleries, Constantine Ltd
    Removing objects from the galleries, Constantine Ltd

Bespoke crating and packaging

Are the objects staying in the museum or are they being shipped nationally or internationally? If they are staying in the museum, the technicians must determine whether they are being placed in short-term or long-term storage, as each requirement entails a different method of packing and conservation. Careful planning and precise handling is vital, with the safety of the object being paramount.

Timescale          

Efficient planning to ensure work is completed by a specific deadline is of great importance to contractors and the museum. Possible challenges which may occur during a project must be taken into consideration. Completing a project on time is also crucial to developing a strong relationship with the museum team.

Surrounding space

Rooms holding collections of paintings or objects vary greatly in size, so it is important to access the area before work can begin. This can have an impact on the overall timescale of the project and can greatly determine was equipment can be used. It is very important to have a clear work area and sufficient transporting space to enable work to be moved freely from other objects and displays. Once large objects are removed it is often surprising how much space can be made available. This is most obvious when packing and crating component parts of a larger piece.

Building structure

Any building with listed status means the protection of the fabric of the building is of specific concern. The team would usually proceed with guidance from Historic England. This can dramatically affect the way a collection is moved or re-installed.

Expect the unexpected

Technicians must be prepared for any challenges that arise. Every project is different and requirements can change at any moment. It is of great importance that the team complete the work to the client’s deadline, so any unexpected challenges must be resolved quickly.

Any of these 10 factors can be challenging for technicians and museum staff. They highlight the many logistical stages that must be considered when relocating collections, and the importance of detailed planning and research before a project begins.

Find out more about Constantine Ltd's work on Twitter and Instagram.

How to empty a Gallery

Our Collections and Documentation team take us behind the scenes during the decant of our Galleries. 

Hello, my name is Sarah and I’m one of the two Collections Management and Documentation Trainees at the Horniman. Thomas, the other trainee, and I started working at the Horniman in July 2016.

Usually, we are based at the Horniman’s Study Collections Centre where many of the fascinating objects in the Museum’s collection are kept. We work in the Collections Management and Documentation departments to care for these objects and make them accessible for current and future generations of Museum visitors.

Thomas and I have spent some of the last six months working directly on one of the Museum’s major projects, the Anthropology Redisplay. Funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) the project re-evaluates the incredible objects in the extensive Anthropology collection in preparation for a new permanent exhibition opening in 2018.

  • How to empty a gallery, The Centenary Gallery during the decant process
    The Centenary Gallery during the decant process

In readiness for the new exhibition two of the Museum’s previous exhibition spaces - African Worlds and the Centenary Gallery - have closed and will be refurbished over the course of the next year. Along with other colleagues from the Collections Management team, Thomas and I spent eight weeks decanting the numerous objects in these galleries, packing them up to travel back to the Study Collections Centre.  

As trainees, decanting these gallery spaces and moving over one thousand objects has been an amazing experience as well as a very good opportunity to test our skills. 

With many different types of objects across two galleries, we were able to try out various methods for packing. We often spend lots of time trialling and experimenting with packaging to ensure it provides adequate protection to each object, therefore preventing any potential damage that could occur while in transit.

Certain methods of packing are more suitable for some objects than others, many objects we worked with during the decant required bespoke packaging to be specially made for them.

One of the most challenging objects Thomas and I worked on was a Naga headdress from north-east India. The headdress was delicate and had a number of large feathers which could be detached.

  • How to empty a gallery, Sarah and Thomas look at the Naga headdress
    Sarah and Thomas look at the Naga headdress

Advised by project conservator Natalie we removed the feathers and packed them separately from the rest of the headdress.

  • How to empty a gallery, Thomas separates the feathers of the Naga headdress ready for packing
    Thomas separates the feathers of the Naga headdress ready for packing

Some other really exciting objects we worked on during the decant where the Museum’s Mummies. Moving them was a real challenge and quite different from the Naga headdress we had previously worked on. Being so large and yet extremely fragile meant that many hands were needed in order to transfer the Mummies from the display case and into a packing crate. It took a team of seven to move each one safely.

We finished the decant in November so Thomas and I are now based back at the Study Collection Centre working to find space for many of the objects that will be staying in storage.

Every day is different and poses new challenges for us to solve. We’ll be continuing to write about our experience as trainees at the Horniman over the next year and a half so keep an eye out for updates on our progress.

Find out more about the Anthropology Redisplay and World Gallery

Wildlife photography - your winner

You voted for your favourite photo from our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition and we reveal the winner...

Our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition was really popular this winter. 

When coming to see the exhibition, visitors were asked to pick which photo was their favourite and leave their comments on a card. 

It was a close call. All of the photographs received at least one vote from the public and there were only a few votes between the top winners. 

We can now exclusively reveal the top three most popular photographs as chosen by our visitors are...

*atmospheric pause*

In third place, the graceful 'Wild European Lynx' by Laurent Geslin.

  • Wildlife photography - your winner, 'Wild European Lynx', Laurent Geslin
    'Wild European Lynx', Laurent Geslin

Here is what some people said about this photograph:

I was drawn to those big eyes and can just imagine him on his long prowls in the night. 

I really like the way the deep sky is captured in the background and how the photographer spent a long time to capture this. 

The contrast, the composition, the elusiveness of the subject. 

In second place, the characterful 'Lightness' by Matteo Lonati. 

  • Wildlife photography - your winner, 'Lightness', Matteo Lonati
    'Lightness', Matteo Lonati

Here is what some people said about this photograph:

It is simple and yet still beautiful.

I like the way the owl is standing to attention like a soldier.

A very arresting photo.

It looks like Hedwig. 

The winner of the public vote is the excellent 'Shadow Walker' by Richard Peters. 

  • Wildlife photography - your winner, 'Shadow Walker', Richard Peters
    'Shadow Walker', Richard Peters

Here is what some people said about this photograph:

It has a beautiful atmosphere.

It reflects the nature in London.

It says so much about the life of the fox - not in shot, he is the hidden king of the urban jungle. 

Because it captures wildlife in an urban setting and reminds us of its presence and beauty. 

Congratulations Richard for winning the public vote as well as the overall competition. 

You can read more about wildlife photography in our interviews with the photographers from this exhibition on our blog

The Badger at Burgh House

Hello, I’m Becky Lodge the Curator at Burgh House, an historic house with a local history museum, based in Hampstead.

We borrowed the Object in Focus taxidermy badger from the Horniman last year and the staff all became very fond of her. We have no natural history specimens in our own collection, and the badger is super cute.

The badger featured in an exhibition of picture postcards of Hampstead called 'Hello from Hampstead! Discovering a History through Postcards'.

Hampstead is a suburb of London that has been a popular visitor destination for centuries, especially for its vast and famous Heath. Not only is the Heath an incredible place to explore, it is host to a wonderful variety of plants and animals.

The badger helped us to show this, complementing our postcards beautifully.

Working with Sarah and the conservators from the Horniman on the loan was a really enjoyable experience. The whole process was so well managed, it was a delight for our small team. Thanks, Horniman Museum and Gardens!

Find out more about our Object in Focus loans project. 

Discover more from Burgh House on their website or connect with them on Facebook and Twitter

Wildlife photography - your views

Our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition has been very popular this winter, with people of all ages coming to see the 84 extraordinary photographs on display. 

Visitors to the exhibition were invited to fill out a card where they voted for their favourite photo and gave a reason why. 

Next week we will be announcing who came first, second and third in our visitor vote, but until then, here are some of our favourite responses so far: 

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Dragon Duel', Tom Way
    'Dragon Duel', Tom Way

It is brutal, other worldly, ancient, timeless. Somehow both alien and godlike. 

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Lion Love in the Rain', Jon Langeland
    'Lion Love in the Rain', Jon Langeland

The photographer has really captured the lioness's expression and the way the water is spraying is excellent.

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Wink', Ingo Arndt
    'Wink', Ingo Arndt

Extremely flirtatious and seductive, like a Spanish dancer or the seducing dance of tango. 

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Like from a Fairy tale', Giuseppe Bonali
    'Like from a Fairy tale', Giuseppe Bonali

A magical look into a micro world

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Under the water, above the water', Mike Korostelev
    'Under the water, above the water', Mike Korostelev

It tells a story in a really inventive way. Being upside down makes it magical, compelling, mysterious and majestic!

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Alien Sighting', David Burtuleit
    'Alien Sighting', David Burtuleit

Sometimes the things on our doorstep can be the most interesting. 

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Shadow Walker', Richard Peters
    'Shadow Walker', Richard Peters

It connects you somehow with a night story happening next to you that you don't know about. It's just outside. 

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Surprised Newt', Pekka Tuuri
    'Surprised Newt', Pekka Tuuri

There are many amazing photos in this exhibition. This one is my favourite because it is a common animal in an amazing situation and it is the only animal with a mohican hairstyle. 

Read our series of interviews with the photogrpahers from this exhibition on our blog

Send us your own wildlife photography by tagging your photos #horniman on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. 

About the Art: Marco Urso

As part of our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, we chat to Marco Urso about his wildlife photography. 

  • About the Art: Marco Urso, 'Missed', Marco Urso
    'Missed', Marco Urso

Tell us the story behind your photo 'Missed'.

Every summer for the last five years, I have spent time at Kuril Lake in Kamchatka. Year after year my idea is to concentrate my photography on uncommon situations. These only occur when you follow a bear around and watch him in his daily life.

The bear in this photograph was a young one and therefore inexperienced. He caught the salmon but relaxed soon afterwards. The salmon 'felt' that and managed to escape, leaving the bear with a strange expression.

How long did you have to wait for this shot?

Quite a bit, I have seen something similar before but I wanted the salmon parallel to the surface of the water so I tried for almost a day.

Did you use any particular equipment?

Not really, a tripod and my normal 500 mm lens.

What are the difficulties of wildlife photography you face?

The challenges are several. Weather, technical equipment problems and recently the misbehaviour of some photographers that forget they have to respect the environment and the species.

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

That I was looking for something different, unusual and less stereotyped. I often try to show the feeling and personality in animals’ behaviour.

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started in your career?

I have been photographing since the age of 14 but only seriously since 2010. I started publishing for magazines, writing articles, organising workshop and participating in competitions.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife in their local environment?

That there is a lot to see and take pictures of without travelling a great distance. It is important to have self-assessment, so there is discipline and a selected view.

What projects are you working on now?

I like bears both browns and polar. I like to photograph their interaction and the cubs. I have just published a book on Polar Bear with WWF: the Lord of the Arctic and soon there will be a second book about the brown bear.

See more of Marco's work on his website and see 'Missed' on display at the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition until 15 January 2017. 

About the Art: Jan van der Greef

As part of our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, we chat to Jan van der Greef about his wildlife photography. 

  • About the Art: Jan van der Greef, 'Mystical Sunset', Jan van der Greef
    'Mystical Sunset', Jan van der Greef

Tell us the story behind your photo 'Mystical Sunset' in this exhibition.

One evening, the sunset nearby our house in the middle of the Netherlands became suddenly very colourful and dynamic due to the sky being filled with clouds and heavy winds.

We drove our car towards a nearby river and while my wife was driving I made an artistic image by using long shutter speeds in order to capture the mystical feeling of that moment.

Photographing from a moving car with longer shutter speeds needs fine-tuning depending on the speed of the car, the movement of the camera, the objective 70-200mm zoom @192mm and the shutter speed (0.5s).

What are the difficulties of wildlife photography you face?

First of all, I typically need quite some time in an area to settle down to feel connected. This is a prerequisite for the artistic (impressionistic, abstract) style of photography.

Furthermore, given my physical challenge, the outcome of having polio at an early age, it is sometimes difficult to find solutions for transport to remote places.

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

I would like them to stop thinking and start feeling.

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started in your career?

As a child, I became interested in nature and since my mother was an amateur photographer, she 'infected' me with the photography-virus. It really started off when I got my first camera - a Konica C35 in my teenage years.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife in their local environment?

Study the animal's behaviour first. Observe and observe some more. Then decide how you would like to capture the essence of the animal or landscape. The focus more on possibilities and not on probabilities. Let your own interest and passion be your guide, forget about rules.

Focus more on possibilities and not on probabilities. Let your own interest and passion be your guide. Forget about rules.

What have you been up to since the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2015 competition?

I am currently working on capturing the essence of wildlife in Africa, a multi-year project. I will also continue my hummingbird project in South America hopefully next year.

What are your favourite scenes to photograph?

I love mystical scenes that give the opportunity for everybody to initiate their imagination.

See more of Jan's work on his website and see 'Mystical Sunset' on display at the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition until 15 January 2017. 

About the Art: Tom Way

As part of our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, we chat to Tom Way about his wildlife photography. 

  • About the Art: Tom Way, 'Dragon Duel', Tom Way
    'Dragon Duel', Tom Way

Tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition

To photograph the largest lizard on the planet is a challenge in itself.

Not only is Komodo National Park difficult to access but getting close enough to the animals can be extremely dangerous. Komodo dragons weigh up to 150kg and have venom and carry fatal bacteria in their bite.

I wanted to try and take close-up portraits of the dragons, so we drifted silently in a small Zodiac boat towards two resting on the shoreline of Rinca Island. The only sound was that of the lapping waves against the beach and the buzz of cicada in the trees. Suddenly there was an explosive whip of the tale as the dragons reared themselves on their back legs clashing together. I wanted to frame the action as large as I could in the frame to show the detail of the skin and to highlight the sand blast against the dark background. There was something extremely prehistoric about this titanic battle as the claws grated against the scales. I felt like it was a snap shot back into a bygone age.

How long did you have to wait for this shot?

I was in Komodo National Park for 3 days.

Did you use any particular equipment?

Canon EOS-1d X, 500mm, 1/3200 sec at f4; ISO 320

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

Typically when photographing large mammals, I am looking to portray the beauty, power and majesty of these wonderful animals.

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started in your career?

I have been a professional wildlife photographer for five years. My passion began whilst travelling after university and wanting to document what I was seeing in the most aesthetic way possible. I decided that with both my passion for wildlife and travel a career as a wildlife photographer would be perfect. After leaving my job, I have spent the last five years building a business in this industry.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife in their local environment?

I would advise that they would need to both spend time with the subject and learn the lay of the land. In this way, you can foresee where the light focuses at certain times of day and also where the subject is likely to be. By knowing your subject well, you are more likely to photograph unusual behaviour.

What have you been up to since the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2015 competition? What projects are you working on now?

Since the 2015 competition, I have been working mostly in East Africa photographing both Lions and Elephants. As a result, I was very pleased to have one of my images awarded in the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2016.

What are your favourite scenes to photograph?

I enjoy photographing in scenes of pure simplicity with no tension points. The open savannahs of East Africa appeal to me as I can separate my subject from the background with ease.

See more of Tom's work on his website and see 'Dragon Duel' on display at the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition until 15 January 2017. 

About the Art: Heike Odermatt

As part of our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, we chat to Heike Odermatt about her work and her photograph, 'New Life'.

  • About the Art: Heike Odermatt, Patiently waiting for the walrus to do something in Svalbard, Heike Odermatt
    Patiently waiting for the walrus to do something in Svalbard, Heike Odermatt

Tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition.

One life has ended and another life arises. In July 2010, there was a big wildfire in the natural heathland – the ‘Strabrechtse Heide’ – in the Netherlands. It affected about 200 hectares of forest and heath, over 10% of the total area. It took several days to master the fire and over a week to put it out completely.

Two years later, I went there to look how the nature has recovered. In the severely affected area, new life was emerging including plants such as young heather, pine, Senecio and pionieer plants such as various types of grasses and fireweed.

I visited this area for several times. During my last visit, I found this place with beautiful grey dead heather and I went in search of a new life and some colour among it. In this photograph, you can see a young pine sheltered by the heath plants which died during the wildfire.

The idea of the photograph was to focus on life and death, old and new. An area destroyed by fire where life seemed extinguished but where new life arises.

  • About the Art: Heike Odermatt, 'New Life', Heike Odermatt
    'New Life', Heike Odermatt

Did you use any particular equipment?

This picture was taken without a tripod because there was enough light to easily frame the image. I didn’t want to damage or change the shape of any part of the plant with the legs of the tripod.

What are the difficulties of wildlife photography you face?

Too many humans and buildings.

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

I like that people get inspired from my images and so also in nature. I want to bring the beauty of nature closer to humans and make them more sensitive to it. I want people to fall in love with nature so they understand how much we need living things and need to be careful with them.

  • About the Art: Heike Odermatt, Northern Gannet on Helgoland (Germany) during the last light. With an exposure of 1/8 seconds I was able to depict the movement of this landing bird, Heike Odermatt
    Northern Gannet on Helgoland (Germany) during the last light. With an exposure of 1/8 seconds I was able to depict the movement of this landing bird, Heike Odermatt

  • About the Art: Heike Odermatt, Sleeping King Penguin on the Falkland Islands. I played with the colour and sharpness to create a more abstract image from the colourful markings of the penguins, Heike Odermatt
    Sleeping King Penguin on the Falkland Islands. I played with the colour and sharpness to create a more abstract image from the colourful markings of the penguins, Heike Odermatt

  • About the Art: Heike Odermatt, I love it when autumn and winter touch each other, like here in a moor in the Vosges., Heike Odermatt
    I love it when autumn and winter touch each other, like here in a moor in the Vosges., Heike Odermatt

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started in your career?

As a child I was fond of pictures, especially pictures of animals and nature. I dreamed of being the person behind the camera, creating those beautiful pictures of wild animals and stunning landscapes.
I had never dared to dream that this would become a reality.

  • About the Art: Heike Odermatt, I shot this image of the Gullfoss waterfall during my first visit to Iceland in the winter in 2004. It was a rainy day and all was green. It looks like a fairy tail., Heike Odermatt
    I shot this image of the Gullfoss waterfall during my first visit to Iceland in the winter in 2004. It was a rainy day and all was green. It looks like a fairy tail., Heike Odermatt

It was years later that I had the opportunity to emerge myself into photography. In 2002, I started to work in nature photography. I was photographing in my holidays – trips that I took purely for nature photography. In my daily life I barely had a chance to go out. Lately though, a lot has changed in my life and I hope that nature photography will be a major part of my life in the future.

  • About the Art: Heike Odermatt, The slope of a mountain with snow and the interplay of light and shadow creates an abstract image. I found this detail during my trip to Svalbard., Heike Odermatt
    The slope of a mountain with snow and the interplay of light and shadow creates an abstract image. I found this detail during my trip to Svalbard., Heike Odermatt

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife in their local environment?

Photograph with an open mind and be passionate. Dare to experiment. Use your heart and your eye to create your images. It is up to us to deal with nature in a fair and responsible manner.

  • About the Art: Heike Odermatt, Photoshoot with curious wild Konik horses in the Netherlands. This picture shows my two passions: horses and Nature Photography., Heike Odermatt
    Photoshoot with curious wild Konik horses in the Netherlands. This picture shows my two passions: horses and Nature Photography., Heike Odermatt

What are your favourite scenes to photograph?

My favourite scenes are the rough landscapes of the North. Mountains, snow and ice and the animals of these environments. For my next project, I will go to the arctic regions again.

See more of Heike's work on her website and see her photograph, 'New Life', on display at the Horniman until 15 January. 

Send us photos of your local wildlife on Twitter or Instagram using the hashtag #horniman

About the Art: Juan Carlos Muñoz

Our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition is running until 15 January. We spoke to photographer Juan Carlos Muñoz about his passion for wildlife photography.

Tell us the story behind your winning photograph ‘Fishing in the Evening in the Hula Valley’.

This photo is based on a beautiful story about wetland conservation as an important stage for birds crossing Israel in their migratory flights between northern territories of Europe and Asia and Africa.

The collaboration between Hula Valley conservationist non-governmental organisations and fish farms plays a crucial role for offering resting sites to birds.

Sighting during an afternoon among fish farm ponds, I was attracted not by the huge concentration of birds resting nearby the water but for a quiet pool with remaining small ponds at its bottom due to fish movement. The light was gorgeous, shining on them and giving a golden ambiance to the moment. The concentration of a black-winged stilt fishing among them gave me the shot.

  • Juan Carlos Muñoz Fishing in the Evening in Hula Valley, Fishing in the Evening in Hula Valley, Juan Carlos Munoz
    Fishing in the Evening in Hula Valley, Juan Carlos Munoz

How did you go about getting that shot?

When I saw the circles pattern with such beautiful natural light I made my decision of getting something special of the site. The continuous motion of the bird wandering among the ponds gave me the chance of waiting for a good position of the bird for doing what I love the most on nature photography: catching surprising moments in wilderness.

How long did you have to wait for this shot?

It was a sort time because of the fading sun on the pond’s surface.

What sort of camera and lens did you use?

I used a camera Canon 7D equipped with a lens 70-300 mm.

What are the difficulties of wildlife photography you face?

Mostly to reach the site where is possible to shoot wildlife.

Sometimes you have to travel far away to get good pics. In Europe there are a lot of restrictions for taking photos of wild animals in nature and to get all the permissions in these rules could be a nightmare and a long stage. Also, this kind of photos require a more sophisticated equipment: heavy to carry, expensive and most difficult to manage in the wilderness.

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

Through my passion and effort I want to show that most important to me is a commitment with nature and its conservation. So showing the astonishing wildlife of the Earth I hope to engage more and more people to recognise the essential importance of nature for us.

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started in your career?

Since I had my university degree in Biology I went for using photography as a vehicle for being close to my passion, nature. However since my childhood wilderness was the best place in the world for me and I spent long time in nature.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife in their local environment?

First off, to learn about the local environments natural process, deals of conservation and challenges to keep it untouched. Knowing and respecting the environment and spending more time in contact with nature is the way to be experienced about wildlife behaviour.

What have you been up to since the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2015 competition? What projects are you working on now?

I am engaged with conservation projects for the return of emblematic species as the Iberian lynx and bearded vulture in Spain. With my photo stories I am helping to protect more territories to be included at the Natura 2000 network.

I support international non-governmental organisations devoted to conservation issues. I work for Rewilding Europe shooting some of the areas included in this European project. Due to the interest of my photo travels I started to organise personalised trips to the most exciting hot spots of worldwide nature.

What are your favourite scenes to photograph?

I feel confident in wilderness, so I go for every scene. However I prefer natural ambiance with wildlife, it is the best way to show a habitat in an attractive and emotional manner.

Because just touching emotions we will engage humankind in preservation of nature.

You can see this photograph in the European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition until the 15 January 2017 and you can find more of Jaun's photography on his website.

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