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A trip to a Nigerian street market

Anthropology curator, Johanna Zetterstrom-Sharp, tells us about her research trip to Eko Market in Lagos, Nigeria.

‘In November 2016 I travelled to Lagos, Nigeria, to work with a talented photographer, Jide Odukoya.

Part of the Horniman’s new World Gallery will focus on Lagos – Nigeria’s largest city. We wanted to capture the vibrancy and energy of the markets on Lagos Island through photography and film.

  • A Nigerian street market, Jide Odukoya in Eko Market − © Johanna Zetterstrom-Sharp
    Jide Odukoya in Eko Market

Lagos is without a doubt the most incredible city I have ever been to. It’s noisy, sticky, busy and frantic, but also exciting and beautiful. There is never a dull moment.

Clambering off the back of a motorbike on my first day, I looked up to see four enormous white concrete horses galloping over the podiums lining the entrance to Tafawa Belawa Square. The monument is named after the first Prime Minister of independent Nigeria who took over from British rule in 1960.

  • A Nigerian street market, Tafawa Belawa Square − © Johanna Zetterstrom-Sharp
    Tafawa Belawa Square

The square is also a major transport junction. From here you can pick-up another bike that takes you into the financial heart of the city.

Steel and glass high-rise office blocks owned by global banks tower over a vast network of street markets.

You soon realise that what may first appear as a chaotic throng of shoppers, buses, and market stalls is meticulously organised. Whether you need shoes, a new tablet, a watch, a blender, nappies, pineapples or a new pair of pants, there will be an area designated for it.

  • A Nigerian street market, Eko Market - the place to find handbags, clothes, belts and shoes. − © Jide Odukoya
    Eko Market - the place to find handbags, clothes, belts and shoes.

My favourite street was jam-packed with toy stalls and school stationary; squeaky children’s shoes, little neon plastic cars, and row-upon-row of Frozen backpacks.

We will try to recreate a stall from this street in the new gallery.

  • A Nigerian street market, Toy Street − © Johanna Zetterstrom-Sharp
    Toy Street

As I followed it up a hill, the street turned into a Lagosian winter wonderland – piles of bright tinsel and great bundles of colourful flashing lights, Christmas trees with fibre-optic pine-needles and mechanical Santas that sang Jingle Bells.

Jide chose to photograph and film Eko market – the place to buy handbags, sunglasses and clothes. His images capture the Lagos hustle.

  • A Nigerian street market, A trader selling denim dungarees− © Jide Odukoya
    A trader selling denim dungarees

Whether you want replica Prada sunglasses, leather belts, denim dungarees, or a crisp white shirt, you can find it here.

His photographs show a meticulously dressed shopper cast a discerning eye over bright patterned dresses and two women sharing a joke after a deal has been struck.

They are vivid and playful – both terms which we hope will be reflected in our exciting new gallery.

  • A Nigerian street market, Two women share a joke− © Jide Odukoya
    Two women share a joke

  • A Nigerian street market, Eko market is the place to buy replica designer sunglasses− © Jide Odukoya
    Eko market is the place to buy replica designer sunglasses

This trip was generously funded by an ICOM WIRP travel grant.’

Find out more about the development of the World Gallery

A Calm Visit to the Horniman

Want to find a quite and peaceful spot in our Museum? Engage Volunteer, Anahita Harding, has just the ticket. Here, she tells us her favourite calm spots and the best times to visit them. 

'Sometimes the Museum can feel quite busy and hectic but for those in the know, there are some places that are a bit quieter where you can get find some peace.

The Gardens are a lovely place to go when a quiet spot is needed but on a rainy day this isn’t always ideal. If you ever need a quiet spot to think and be calm, here are some indoor spaces I like to go to during my breaks.

Nature Base

If you want to see the harvest mice, come to the Nature Base in the morning, as this is the best time to see them running and climbing! The harvest mice are crepuscular, which means that they are most active in the mornings and in the evenings.

The quietest time tends to be in the morning when the Museum has just opened but the Nature Base can get busy during other times of the day.

  • A calm visit to the Horniman, The harvest mice in the Nature Base are best seen in the morning.
    The harvest mice in the Nature Base are best seen in the morning.

The Natural History Gallery balcony

The Natural History Gallery balcony has a variety of cases with interesting specimens in them. There is also a nice space here to read stories and books. A grand clock is near the staircase, and it gently chimes every fifteen minutes. It is called the Apostle Clock and was made during the 19th century in Germany.

Usually, the balcony is very quiet and is a nice space to learn while watching everyone in the gallery below. There is also a good view of the walrus!

  • A calm visit to the Horniman, The apostle clock is on the Natural History Gallery balcony
    The apostle clock is on the Natural History Gallery balcony

The Aquarium

Have you seen the jellyfish in the Aquarium? As you enter the Aquarium you will see a space lit up with a calming blue light, and jellyfish gently moving through their tank. It is lovely to watch them move. Above, you will see a large turtle hanging from the ceiling, can you find it? This is one of my favourite spots, and I hope you enjoy it too.'

  • A calm visit to the Horniman, Watching the jellyfish can be very calming
    Watching the jellyfish can be very calming

The Museum is at it's quietest after 2.30pm on weekdays during term time. 

Share your favourite peaceful spots from the Museum and Gardens with us using #horniman.

Find out more about volunteering at the Horniman

SEND schools programme shortlisted for award

We are very excited that our SEND school programme has been shortlisted for a Museums & Heritage award this year. Here to tell us more about the programme is our Schools Learning Officer, Maria Magill. 

'The question I get asked most is, 'What do you do when you’re not teaching?' Among other things, I get to work on developing our offer for schools, particularly for special educational needs schools. This is one of the most fun aspects of my job.

Our programme of sensory sessions and resources has been shortlisted for a Museums & Heritage Award this year in the category of Education Initiative. The Schools Team couldn’t be more excited!

SEND Sensory Session: A Musical Adventure was developed as part of the legacy of a project with Peoplescape Theatre Company. It is a music session using instruments from Brazil and Nigeria. Pupils help a character ‘Rebecca’ and travel to each country to collect instruments to bring back to the Museum.

Encountering storms on the sea (making wave sounds with our ocean drum), visiting the Brazilian rainforest to be surrounded by butterflies and birds (fluttering tissue paper shapes), and helping to pack a suitcase, as well as learning a Yoruba song of welcome, all form part of this fun session.

SEND Sensory Session: Ancient Egyptian Mummification was developed due to teacher requests. Pupils engage with a sensory story exploring how Mr Horniman collected artefacts from Egypt.

They explore the process of mummification through a range of sensory experiences and objects. They have a go at bandaging, exploring the spices and tools used in mummification (salt, frankincense, cedar oil, beeswax) and handle real Ancient Egyptian objects including a mummy mask.

Alongside the sessions, we’ve worked to make the Museum visit more accessible and inclusive.

There is a social story on our website showing the rooms schools will visit, the things they will see and who they will meet.

We’ve had training to help us incorporate Makaton signing into our sessions and we’ve got software to enable us to create Widgit flashcards as another communication tool.

We’ve had a rethink about how we set up our workshop spaces, changed our tablecloths to make objects easier to see and made cushions available to sit on the floor.

  • SEND schools programme shortlisted for award, Widgit cards
    Widgit cards

Next steps involve creating a new science sensory session linked to our Aquarium and creating a day schedule using Widgit cards which we can share with schools before they visit.

To be shortlisted for a Museum & Heritage Award shows us that we are on the right track, and gives us a renewed burst of enthusiasm to keep improving our offer, making it more accessible for all participants, and to keep improving our professional practice. We’ve just started and we’re excited to keep going!

If you would like to find out more or book a session please contact us at 0208 291 8686 or email schools@horniman.ac.uk.

For more information visit this SEND group page on our website.'

Specimen of the Month: The Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

Our Deputy Keeper of Natural History, Dr Emma-Louise Nicholls, gets to know the enigmatic Platypus. 

Our Venomous Piece of the Past

We have a number of platypodes (or platypuses if you prefer, but never platypi), however, this one is part of the original Frederick Horniman Collection. That enigmatic accolade means it must have been acquired by our illustrious founder, and prior to the Museum opening in 1906. So in modern social media speak, it’s well old.

We don’t know what the platypus looked like when it was first acquired by the Museum; it could have been either a skin or a taxidermy mount. Either way, at some time in the past the platypus was ‘re-set’ (wording on record card), by the taxidermist Charles Thorpe, into the swimming position that you can see in the image below. The price for this exquisite demonstration of skill was £0 d7 s6. For those who didn’t suffer through the confusing period of decimalisation, £0 d7 s6 means zero pounds, seven pennies, and six shillings, the value of that price today is around £10 (an exact figure is impossible to calculate on the basis we don’t know what year the work was carried out).

  • Specimen of the Month: The Platypus, Our platypus is over 100 years old, and was given a make-over sometime in the early to mid-1900s
    Our platypus is over 100 years old, and was given a make-over sometime in the early to mid-1900s

We know the specimen is a male as it has a sharp spike, called a spur, on the rear of each thigh. Platypodes* are one of the few mammals that are venomous, and the small amount of venom that can be injected through one of these spurs is potent enough to kill mammals many times their size. I was told by a friend who works in a zoo in Australia that their colleague was once spurred in the arm. Apparently, it was so painful he was pleading with the doctors for his arm to be amputated, ouch! During the mating season the amount of venom a male produces increases, which presumably means one of the main purposes of evolving such potent venom is to fend off rival males and get a girlfriend. In more anthropogenic cases, recent research suggests platypus venom could be used in a treatment for Type 2 diabetes. For which they have frisky platypuses to thank I guess.

They Don’t Have Teeth

Platypodes don’t have teeth in the traditional sense. Their fossil ancestors had teeth but the modern platypus decided the sound of growing their own enamel was reason for concern, and produced coarse keratin pads instead. A mouth full of hair** sounds disgusting, and it only seems to work ‘fairly well’ to boot, as according to a number of sources, platypodes will also scoop up coarse gravel to aid mastication. Perhaps they should have planned it out better before embarking on their otherwise admirable attempt to avoid expensive dental bills.

Platypodes are bottom feeders (legit term), which means animals that feed off of the substrate in aquatic environments. In the case of the platypus, it lives in rivers and uses the receptors in its bill to pick up the electrical signals given off by their prey, which are normally found in the form of insects, insect larvae, worms and shellfish.

  • Specimen of the Month: The Platypus, As platypodes don't have teeth, the keeper was in no danger of being bitten.− © Adrian Good
    As platypodes don't have teeth, the keeper was in no danger of being bitten.

They Do Have Teeth

Platypodes don’t have teeth… I wasn’t lying before. However, platypodes are monotremes which means they lay eggs. One of only two mammals to do so, the other being the echidna. As with more traditional egg breaking youngsters like those belonging to birds and many reptiles, for example, the tiny egg-bound platypus has to break its way out of the egg. For this, its ancestry provided it with an egg-tooth on the top of its bill. This tooth is only a temporary facial addition that, once the baby platypus has broken free of its yolky home, will normally be shed within the next two days. The egg-tooth is not a real tooth as ours are, but a sharp, tooth-shaped structure made of keratin, around 0.3 mm high. That may seem ridiculously small but a freshly hatched platypus is only around the size of a kidney bean so any larger and it would probably get neck ache.

  • Specimen of the Month: The Platypus, These line drawings show the development of the platypus from the day of hatching to five days post-hatching. The egg-tooth can be seen in the first two columns of sketches. The protuberance on the bill in the two right-hand columns represent the caruncle, or fleshy nub, left behind by the egg-tooth. , Image from Manger et al., 1998
    These line drawings show the development of the platypus from the day of hatching to five days post-hatching. The egg-tooth can be seen in the first two columns of sketches. The protuberance on the bill in the two right-hand columns represent the caruncle, or fleshy nub, left behind by the egg-tooth. , Image from Manger et al., 1998

* The more I say it, the more you’ll get used to it
** Keratin is the protein that makes up your hair and fingernails

References

ARKive
Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

Live Science
Platypus Facts 

Manger, P. R., Hall, L. S., and Pettigrew, J. D. (1998). The development of the external features of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 353 pp.1115-1125

National Geographic
Platypus 

Project Britain
Old English Money 

Tosatto, D., and Zool, W. S. (2016). Feeding and digestive mechanisms of Obdurodon dicksonii and its implications for the modern Platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. Unpublished. pp.1-12

Redstart Arts Discovery Box

Redstart Arts have been running creative projects at the Horniman for several years. Here, artist Cash Aspeek describes their current work on the Discovery Box project.

Over fifteen different community partners are helping the Horniman create new boxes that will be used by visitors and groups for years to come. They are like mini museums, selecting a group of objects that follow a theme chosen by the group.

Redstart Arts are making their own Discovery Box for the Horniman. The objects the group are choosing are from the Horniman’s Handling Collection as well as handmade objects by the Redstarts (artists with learning disabilities) themselves, made especially for the project.

Redstart Arts’ theme is ‘Protection’.

During the past two years, the Redstarts have become familiar with the Horniman's galleries and many of the objects displayed in them. Each Redstart artist has had been allowed the time and space to select objects that they are particularly drawn to and make studies of them. These objects all had the common theme of protection.

All the sessions for this project involve a group activity where we come together to look at and experience a selection of objects.

Each Redstart is able to connect to different areas of the Horniman's collection and show their interest in the form of drawings, photographs, and conversation, which may come about through storytelling and dramatic scenarios.

The artist educators and Horniman staff are excited with the way the project has developed and are captivated by the incredible focus of the individual Redstart artists. 

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, Kimberly is making objects inspired by shells that create incredible and varied protective environments for sea creatures. Kimberly is using model magic and milliput.
    Kimberly is making objects inspired by shells that create incredible and varied protective environments for sea creatures. Kimberly is using model magic and milliput.

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, Byron is making his own protective mask and talisman pendants working alongside Hannah who is using plaster and modeling materials.
    Byron is making his own protective mask and talisman pendants working alongside Hannah who is using plaster and modeling materials.

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, Uduehi enjoys drawing and is particularly interested in how animals protect their families.
    Uduehi enjoys drawing and is particularly interested in how animals protect their families.

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, David is embroidering images from the Natural History Gallery onto blue satin discs. This will become a protective cloak to be worn. Each disc has a drawing by all the Redstarts.
    David is embroidering images from the Natural History Gallery onto blue satin discs. This will become a protective cloak to be worn. Each disc has a drawing by all the Redstarts.

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, David is embroidering images from the Natural History Gallery onto blue satin discs. This will become a protective cloak to be worn. Each disc has a drawing by all the Redstarts.
    David is embroidering images from the Natural History Gallery onto blue satin discs. This will become a protective cloak to be worn. Each disc has a drawing by all the Redstarts.

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, Colleen is designing fabric inspired by African figures. The fabric will be used to protect the Akuaba doll. This doll was given to women to look after as if it were a baby in order to aid their fertility and allow them to be ready for motherhood.
    Colleen is designing fabric inspired by African figures. The fabric will be used to protect the Akuaba doll. This doll was given to women to look after as if it were a baby in order to aid their fertility and allow them to be ready for motherhood.

Our Conservatory under wraps

We are carrying out some essential conservation and improvements to our Grade II listed Conservatory.

We host a range of events in our Conservatory, especially weddings and civil ceremonies, and the work will include the installation of heating beneath a beautiful tiled floor, interior lighting and better drainage.

The work is due to be completed in March 2017.  

Did you know?

The conservatory was originally built at the Horniman family house at Coombe Cliffe, Croydon, in 1894.

Coombe Cliffe house had been the home of our founder's parents, and Frederick Horniman's mother lived there until her death in 1900. After being sold in 1903, the house later served as a convalescent home for children, college of art, education centre and teachers' hub.

Over the years, many voices spoke out for the need for preservation of the Coombe Cliff Conservatory, as the house was eventually left abandoned and suffered from neglect. In 1977, the building suffered considerable damage in a fire.

Eventually, it was decided that the best way to preserve this listed building was to dismantle and move it to another location.

The dismantled Conservatory was eventually moved to the Horniman in 1986, and its reconstruction began in June 1987. The ambitious restoration project was completed in 1989.

We hope, with these restoration works, we can keep the Conservatory in use for many years to come.

Find out how you can hire the Conservatory for your wedding or event. 

International Women's Day 2017

Today, 8 March, is International Women's Day, where we celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievement of women around the world. 

This year's International Women's Day theme is Be Bold For Change

Here at the Horniman, we have a whole host of amazing women working and volunteering in our Museum and Gardens. We invited some of them to share how they are going to be bold this year. 

The responses were great. Some were personal challenges for the year ahead, some were calls to action and all of them were personal and empowering. 

Here are some of the ways the women of the Horniman are going to be bold. 

  • International Women's Day 2017, Volunteering again with Cultural Heritage without Borders in a new city in Kosovo
    Volunteering again with Cultural Heritage without Borders in a new city in Kosovo

  • International Women's Day 2017, Turn my words into actions
    Turn my words into actions

  • International Women's Day 2017, Do more for my kids in Zimbabwe - www.themichaelproject.org
    Do more for my kids in Zimbabwe - www.themichaelproject.org

  • International Women's Day 2017, Release more creativity
    Release more creativity

  • International Women's Day 2017, A mum returning to the workplace after a decade at home!
    A mum returning to the workplace after a decade at home!

  • International Women's Day 2017, Trek Machu Picchu (must go to gym first!)
    Trek Machu Picchu (must go to gym first!)

  • International Women's Day 2017, Support art made by women
    Support art made by women

How are you going to be #BeBoldForChange this year?

Share your answers with us using #horniman

National Museums and Wellbeing Week

Our Community Engagement Coordinator Jess Croll-Knight talks about wellness and the role that museums play in their local community.

This week we are celebrating the second National Museums and Wellbeing Week from 6 – 12 March 2017, coordinated by the National Alliance for Museums, Health & Wellbeing.

The Community Engagement team are proud to work with a range of local organisations and services that provide mental health and wellbeing support for people. These partnerships really help us understand how the Collections and Gardens can help enrich and support positive wellbeing for people who visit the Horniman. This might include opportunities to be active and social, to try or learn something new, use objects in multi-sensory and creative ways, or just relax and have fun in a different environment. 

All sorts of activities happen at the Horniman that support positive wellbeing. Here is a snapshot of what is happening this week.

We are running projects with a range of partners, including the Greenwich and Lewisham Young People’s Theatre ‘Whatever’ Project, Redstart Arts and Three C’s, to create new discovery boxes. The boxes contain a selection of objects from our Handling Collection, based around a theme that is relevant to them. They are aimed at families and groups who are exploring the Hands on Base. To create the boxes, group members take the lead in choosing a theme and decide which objects go in their box. This helps develop skills working with Museum objects, sharing interests and experiences with each other, taking part in creative activities, and ultimately creating a resource that will be used by visitors to the Horniman for years to come. The Horniman are welcoming

This week we are also welcoming Pan Intercultural Arts to the Horniman, who work supporting self-expression and empowerment with a young refugee arts group.

Elliot Bank School’s Museum Club will be back again this week learning about the Museum's collections and Gardens through art and crafts. And the Horniman Youth Panel, who also meet each week, play an important role in decision-making and getting young people’s voices heard at the Horniman. 

We are really excited to have started a project with local families learning English as another language with ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages). They are helping to create interpretation panels (the labels you read in galleries) for the new World Gallery and Studio. The sessions are a chance for people to be sociable and practice language skills in a different environment, but also to play an active and critical role in making the Horniman a welcoming place for all families in the local community.

Crossing Borders also takes place this week. We are asking people to join us in celebrating the diversity of our Forest Hill neighbourhood and the people that live here, through storytelling, art and craft activities and immersive theatre performances. This annual event is a collaboration between organisations and individuals who work with local refugees and asylum seekers. Everyone is welcome so come along on Saturday 11 March.

Finally, we welcome the Raise the Roof Community Choir which provides an uplifting opportunity for people to explore music together.

Museums and gardens are an amazing resource for feeling well and happy, being active and taking part in activities. We hope the Horniman can continue building on all of this work and help promote the wellbeing of our community and all our visitors.

Have a look at the Wheel of Wellbeing for more inspiration! 

The women and children of Barry House

As part of our annual Crossing Borders event, we spoke to Anne-Catherine Le Deunff, who is an Art Therapist working at Southwark Day Centre for Asylum Seekers, a centre for vulnerable refugees, migrants and asylum seekers. She tells us about what life is like running the art therapy sessions with the women and children at Barry House, a hostel for asylum seekers run by the Home Office.

Every Wednesday evening is different in Barry House.

Women and children join our group, settle for a while in the temporary accommodation (a few days, a week, a month) and then they go.

We get to know each other, we become friends or we simply learn how to pronounce each other’s name and then, one day, the woman or the child is gone to Leeds, Liverpool, Birmingham or Cardiff and you might not see each other again.

Once in a while, you are lucky enough to say, “Goodbye, good luck, take care of yourself…”

Every day we are assailed by images in the media showing the desperate movement of migrants arriving in Europe. These are people fleeing war, persecution or poverty. Leaving their country without hope of returning in the near future, they are separated from their homes, their relatives, their friends. They are in constant fear of losing their loved ones back home. Along the way, they have suffered abuse from people smugglers, they have got used to being rejected and mistreated and they are likely to have been confronted with death. Some images might stay in their mind and they might have troubles sleeping because of them.

After these traumatic events they are in need of interventions to support them on a psychological level, as well as to help them get by in their new lives. Creative therapy provides some release or structure within which their experiences can be expressed.

At our arrival in Barry House, the children run towards us - excited, curious. They help us set up the Art Therapy Room. The mums might arrive later. They come on their own or with a friend or two, to share their stories with the group. Soon, everyone starts painting or drawing, immersed in their imaginary world. We never stop giving sheets of paper on which they express themselves and communicate. They do not need to speak the same language; their images talk for them.

These regular sessions provide a measure of release and give some structure to the women and children’s lives. It enables them to give some meaning to their experience.

We often observe one or two sad children gazing at us in silence. You can guess that they are affected by their parents’ anxiety and depression. They might even have to become their mother and father’s carer as they learn English quickly.  In our group, we try to offer them a space to play, showing these children a way to enter a world where they are in control. We are struck by their need to be treated as individuals after their experiences finding their way to our country.

Art demands active participation therefore it helps with combatting apathy. It enhances wellbeing and offers the migrants some time to stop worrying. It might help contain and calm a distressed adult, a restless child.

Many women might have never been given the opportunity to create. They might never have used paints before and might be reluctant to start. When they feel trusting enough of the environment, and of us, only then can they allow their emotions to express themselves. They can also use this time to dream and explore in a secure and safe space.

Children who may be seen to have lost their childhoods are provided a positive and creative experience. They are able to share stories and situations from their past, using the artistic medium in whichever way they wish, in a safe and nurturing environment. They will be listened to and the therapist will validate their experiences, enabling them to move forward, to start to heal. Later on, those children who have been helped to survive and cope will integrate in our schools and often thrive.

In Barry House, it is not possible to start proper therapy as there is not enough time to go in depth and talk about the women’s inner lives - the confusion and despair that we see in their eyes. We offer mothers this space and time to breathe, bond with their children and be a mum like any other mum. We would like to think that we provide some opportunity for creative growth.

One woman from Yemen invited us to her bedroom where her new born baby boy was being blessed. She had been attending our group regularly, all through her pregnancy.  We were pleased to see that she decorated her room with her refined and colourful artwork.

For me, she was not a victim anymore but a real artist, proud of her work.

You can take part in a drawing workshop with Southwark Day Centre for Asylum Seekers as part of Crossing Borders on 11 March, based on the drawings made by women and children during art therapy at the Centre or Barry House.

World Book Day 2017

In celebration of World Book Day on 2 March 2017, Gill Poole shows us some of the fascinating books in the Horniman Library.

Our Library is an eclectic collection of books, old and new. We have some rare volumes from Frederick Horniman’s original collection as well as newer books acquired over the years to complement the Museum’s various objects and exhibitions.

Gill works in our Library and has the important task of caring for our books and all the requests from people who want to read them. Gill has picked out some of her favourite books from the collection to share with us here for World Book Day. Take it away Gill…

Japanese Fairy Tales

HASEGAWA, T. ,  THOMPSON, David ,  CHAMBERLAIN, Basil Hall  &  HEPBURN, James Curtis  (1885-1889)

These beautiful books area a joy to read because they are so gorgeous. Each volume is colourfully illustrated and the pages are made from crepe paper which makes them soft to the touch. They are story books, translated into English to share to a wider audience all the wonderful fairy tales from Japan.

  • World Book Day 2017, Japanese Fairy Tales
    Japanese Fairy Tales

  • World Book Day 2017, Japanese Fairy Tales
    Japanese Fairy Tales

The Anatomy of Horses

STUBBS, George  (1853)

I love horses and I wish I could draw like this! These are the anatomical drawings made by George Stubbs before he started painting his famous horse portraits such as ‘Whistlejacket’. You can see each picture is meticulously accurate, down to the position of each bone, which is why his later paintings are so beautifully lifelike.

  • World Book Day 2017, The Anatomy of Horses
    The Anatomy of Horses

  • World Book Day 2017, The Anatomy of Horses
    The Anatomy of Horses

Ocean Flowers and their Teachings

HOWARD, Mary Matilda  (1847)

This is a rare book and part of Frederick Horniman’s original collection. It is special because it contains 38 real specimens of seaweed pressed inside. It is amazing that is has survived for so long.

  • World Book Day 2017, Ocean Flowers and their teachings
    Ocean Flowers and their teachings

  • World Book Day 2017, Ocean Flowers and their teachings
    Ocean Flowers and their teachings

  • World Book Day 2017, Ocean Flowers and their teachings
    Ocean Flowers and their teachings

Episodes of Insect Life

 BUDGEN, L. M.  (1849-18)

This is a wonderful book. In it, the author tries to make insects seem less… yuck. By creating short stories and poems, he hopes to inspire people to overcome their initial prejudices about insects and get them interested in entomology. It is a very modern approach and makes the book very readable, unlike many dry and dusty books about entomology of the time.

  • World Book Day 2017, Episodes of Insect Life
    Episodes of Insect Life

  • World Book Day 2017, Episodes of Insect Life
    Episodes of Insect Life

  • World Book Day 2017, Episodes of Insect Life
    Episodes of Insect Life

This Sunday we are celebrating World Book Day at our Library Open Day. Come and drop in, no need to book an appointment, and see these fascinating volumes, as well as many more. 

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