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About the Art: Wind Organ

We spoke to Ali Miharbi to learn all about his new 'Wind Organ' installation which can be found in the Horniman Gardens.

  • Ali_Miharbi_Wind_Organ_Horniman_300dpi (002), Delfina Foundation− © Delfina Foundation
    , Delfina Foundation

What the materials are that the pipes are made of?

They are made of stainless steel pipes.

How tall they are and their maximum width?

Each of them is 3 meters tall, but there is an additional 75 cm part that is underground to hold them in place. The maximum diameter of the pipes that they’re made of is 7 cm. There are also 2cm and 4cm sections and the poles that support them are also 4cm.

How are the different vowel sounds created by the pipes?

When the wind flows through the slots, the pipes are played by the wind, like a side-blown flute is played. Different combinations of pipe diameters act as filters and change the characteristics of the sounds. Each pole carries three separate flutes welded on top of each other. They face different directions so that they can capture a wider range of wind directions.

How long did each pipe take to make?

Altogether the production took less than a month, but the preparation was longer. There was a period of a few months for testing different materials and techniques by building prototypes. Also, the idea was a result of much earlier projects that used air compressors instead of wind

What inspired this installation?

The Wind Organ is a continuation of my ongoing interest in the materiality of sound, information, and its relationship with space. My solo exhibition at Pilot Gallery in Istanbul in April 2017 was entitled "Pneuma" and revolved around the subjects of wind, voice, breath, the routines as well as the unexpected of everyday life for which weather was not only a metaphor but also a component that sometimes literally flowed through the work. Getting out of the gallery space and experimenting with the wind directly was something I had been thinking for a while and I had been doing research about aeolian harps (there is one in the Horniman Museum collection that I saw during my residency at Delfina foundation in Winter 2017) and other instruments played by the wind, and as an extension of my previous work, I had the idea to connect the voice-like sounds I have been experimenting with, with an instrument played by the wind. Not only the musical instrument collection and the gardens, but also other collections of the museum such as the natural history department all resonated with these ideas.

How did you go about creating it? What different iterations did you go through with this piece?

First came the rough idea where there were many different options for the technique, some of them unknown at the beginning. Then came research. At the end, practical tests gained speed, but they were always informed by what people have done and found out earlier in many other fields such as experimental music instrument building, the acoustics of speech, and aeolian instruments - both contemporary and traditional.

Was the result what you expected?

More and less, but when everything was finished, the final feeling of watching and listening to it had an unpredictable and unexpected aspect which is is a nice thing to have.

What would you like people to think of or consider when they experience the sound or see the installation?

I think this is one of those pieces that speaks for itself, as long as there is some breeze giving it a voice. Even if people would watch and listen to it without knowing that the shapes they see were designed after vowel resonators, they still wouldn’t miss much.

This installation is in our Gardens. How important are nature and the outdoors to your work?

Since this is an instrument played by the wind, it is crucial that the piece is outdoors and directly influenced by the wind. But this is the first time I am making such an outdoor installation. A lot of my previous works consisted of indoor installation and many of them required electricity to function.

Are you working on any other projects or do you have any other work that people can go and visit?

Currently, I am just finished with this, so no, but I think this installation will lead to experimentations with different variations in the future.

 

About the Art: Peter Forder

The Friends’ Art Exhibition is held in our Conservatory and showcases paintings, prints, textile art and sculptures from South London’s artist community. 

The exhibition is a platform for new and established local artists, with all proceeds contribute to Horniman Museum and Gardens projects.

This year, we are talking to some of the artists involved in the exhibition to find out more about their work. Here, we speak to Peter Forder about his work in oil on canvas.

What is the story behind your artwork?

Bitterns: I was very excited to see bitterns at Minsmere in Suffolk. They are big birds (there is a stuffed one in the Horniman) and look rather odd, like primeval killing machines; they seem slow and heavy in flight. I’ve tried to suggest these things in the picture.

  • Peter Forder artwork, Peter Forder
    , Peter Forder

The fox and the moon: I wanted this to be quite an elemental picture: a wild animal out hunting, alone with the moon up in Space. I also like the way a gibbous moon seems to hang in the sky like an egg.

  • Peter Forder artwork, Peter Forder
    , Peter Forder

Allotment in June: I hope this picture, done at Grove Park, suggests the heavy lushness of a June afternoon on an allotment. Some people say not to use black in painting, but I use it like anything.

  • Peter Forder artwork, Peter Forder
    , Peter Forder

Spring flowers with quinces: I am inspired by the flower pieces of British painter Sir Cedric Morris (1889-1981), and I think this picture has something of a period feel. It contains tulips, narcissi, bluebells, cornflowers and woad.

  • Peter Forder artwork, Peter Forder
    , Peter Forder

Tulips with quinces and broccoli: I like the rich colours of tulips and the crazy shapes of the parrot ones. I grow them on the allotment - an easy early crop.

  • Peter Forder artwork, Peter Forder
    , Peter Forder

What inspires you in day-to-day life?

Gardens and allotments, wildlife and nature, paintings and ceramics.

Why do you think it is important to support local artists?

Arts are about people expressing themselves and hopefully touching a chord with others. This doesn’t have to be done in a grand gallery (though I like grand galleries too!).

I would like to see more people have original works of art on their walls - with the textures and brush strokes made by the artist - rather than mass reproductions. So they need to be able to see local work, and afford to buy it.

Finally, like most people, I live in the suburbs, and I suppose my pictures concern suburban things, which I think are neglected in favour of the urban, the rural and the maritime. So let’s fly the flag for art in the suburbs!

How to make an origami walrus

Coco Sato shows us how to recreate our star Natural History specimen in paper form. 

We recently had origami artist, Coco Sato, come into the Museum for one of our Big Wednesday events. 

Coco made some amazing giant origami animals with our visitors and had a pop-up installation in our Music Gallery. 

As an added extra for us, Coco showed us how to make an origami walrus, in honour of the big man himself.

It was modelled on the walrus in our Natural History Gallery. Here, you can see how Coco copied the walrus' shape and size into paper form. 

If you would like to make your own origami walrus, you can watch the following video where Coco goes through the whole process. 

All you need is a square of coloured paper and some scissors. 

If you do manage to master the skill, share your masterpieces with us on social media using #horniman.

A source of arty inspiration

Our Engage Volunteer, Sam, tells us about how our collections have inspired her artwork. 

Even before becoming an Engage Volunteer I was inspired by the fantastic collections at the Horniman. 

The artefacts in what was the African Worlds Gallery have provided an especially rich source of material for my sketches and sculpture I’ve produced over the years.

Since becoming an Engage volunteer I can get up really close and personal with the actual objects themselves and I love to share my enthusiasm with the public too!

  • Project Morrinho at the Horniman , A colourful sketch of the Horniman Clocktower
    A colourful sketch of the Horniman Clocktower

My work mainly focuses on memory. Do objects have a memory? Do they provoke a memory of your own? Or do they serve as a collective memory for a group of people?

I often combine my own memories of travelling and the experiences I’ve had into my work and the materials I use.

  • Portal, Portal
    Portal

I have always had a fascination with masks. I have collected and sketched them on my travels around Mexico and Africa. Beautiful, ugly, mysterious and powerful, they hook my imagination and keep drawing me back.

  • Sky Earth Kanaga Mask, Sky Earth Kanaga Mask
    Sky Earth Kanaga Mask

In River Memory Mask the wood itself forms the contours of the map of a face, with the river flowing through it linking the future to the past. The mirrored eye and stones with holes also ward off evil as seen in masks and amulets at the Horniman, like this African Nkisi, this Kurdish charm or this English protective charm. I’m spoilt for choice of inspiration!

  • River Memory Mask  , River Memory Mask
    River Memory Mask

The Anthropology blogs are a great way to find out about how the Anthropology Collections are being re-displayed. I can’t wait until the work is finished and the new World Gallery opens next year!

Have any of the objects at the Horniman sparked memories for you? 

Share your thoughts with us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram using #horniman. 

Museum Club wildlife photography

Children from Horniman Primary School come to our Museum once a week for an after-school Museum Club.

Last term they created their own photography inspired by our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition.

The children wrote their own labels which explain why they chose the animal and how they decided to photograph it.

Their photographs show a talent for composition. A lot of time was taken to think about the characteristics of the animals they were photographing and how the animals act in their natural habitats. 

Here are a few examples of these artistic photographs. 

'Midsummer Night breeze!' by Maisie 

  • Midsummer Night breeze!, A baby rabbit is called a kit, a female rabbit is called a doe and a male is called a buck. I chose this animal because I want people see what would have happened when the sun goes down. It makes a beautiful contrast with the mouse and the bird. The background makes the animals stand out
, Maisie
    A baby rabbit is called a kit, a female rabbit is called a doe and a male is called a buck. I chose this animal because I want people see what would have happened when the sun goes down. It makes a beautiful contrast with the mouse and the bird. The background makes the animals stand out , Maisie

'ΜΑΎΡΟ ΚΑΙ ΆΣΠΡΟ ΖΩΉΣ' (black and white life) by Sophia

  • Black and White Life, I took this photo of a badger because of its large size and secretive way of living. The background shows the pattern of the badger's fur. Badgers are short-legged omnivores in the family mustelidae, which includes otters, polecats, weasels and wolverines, Sophia
    I took this photo of a badger because of its large size and secretive way of living. The background shows the pattern of the badger's fur. Badgers are short-legged omnivores in the family mustelidae, which includes otters, polecats, weasels and wolverines, Sophia

'Criaturas que Cazan' (hunting creatures) by Rosa and Angel

  • Criaturas que Cazan â hunting creatures, These animals circle in a fight for survival. The stoat, a wonderfully deft animal, edges away from the looming buzzard. We angled it so the elegant bird seems to look disdainfully down upon the lonely stoat, Rosa and Angel
    These animals circle in a fight for survival. The stoat, a wonderfully deft animal, edges away from the looming buzzard. We angled it so the elegant bird seems to look disdainfully down upon the lonely stoat, Rosa and Angel

'Awesome Elster' (awesome magpie) by Lucian

  • Awesome Elster â awesome magpie, I love the Magpie because he has a cute face.  I think he has a serious expression.  The feathers of a magpie are very soft.  Its feet are very small.  I angled it so it's looking you in the eye
, Lucian
    I love the Magpie because he has a cute face. I think he has a serious expression. The feathers of a magpie are very soft. Its feet are very small. I angled it so it's looking you in the eye , Lucian

'The Bird with Blue' by Livvy 

  • The Bird With Blue,  I was looking for an animal, then this one stood out like a shining star. I thought that it would look nice on a blue background. Blue jays are sometimes known to eat eggs or nestlings, and it is this practice that has tarnished their reputation
, Livvy
    I was looking for an animal, then this one stood out like a shining star. I thought that it would look nice on a blue background. Blue jays are sometimes known to eat eggs or nestlings, and it is this practice that has tarnished their reputation , Livvy

'The Semi-Darkness' by Caity

  • The Semi-Darkness , I chose to photograph the mongoose because it is interesting how it looks like a meerkat.  I like how pretty the fur is. I think the animal goes well with the background. I hope you like it too, Caity
    I chose to photograph the mongoose because it is interesting how it looks like a meerkat. I like how pretty the fur is. I think the animal goes well with the background. I hope you like it too, Caity

We had the Museum Club's photographs specially printed and they are now on display in our Education Centre.

Find out more about school sessions at the Horniman

Can you name five women artists?

Ask someone to name five artists and responses will likely include names such as Warhol, Picasso, van Gogh, Monet, da Vinci – all male artists.

So, for Women’s History Month this March, we wanted to take part in a social media challenge put forward by the National Museum of Women in the Arts addressing the gender imbalance in how art is presented – can you name five women artists?

We wanted to share with our followers some of the fantastic objects we have in our collection made by female artists and makers.

Apolonia Nowak

These beautiful papercuts were specially made for the Horniman in 2008 as part of an exhibition we ran on the art of Polish papercuts. They are of the 'Gwiazda' type from the Kurpie region of Poland. Gwiazda means ‘star’ in Polish and these types of papercuts are made from a single sheet of coloured paper, typically featuring geometric designs.

The circular blue papercut has an asymmetrical picture of Mary and the baby Jesus in the centre, and geometrical design around them. The circular black papercut has an asymmetrical picture of a dancing couple from the Kurpie region in the centre, with a geometrical design around them.

Read more about Polish papercutting.

  • Can you name five women artists?, Papercut artworks by Apolonia Nowak
    Papercut artworks by Apolonia Nowak

Lynette Nampijimpa Granites Nelson

Lynette is a Warlpiri Indigenous Australian artist from Yuendumu, a town in the Northern Territory of Australia. Warlpiri country is east of the border between Western Australia and the Northern Territory in the Tanami Desert.

The painting below is titled 'Ngapa Jukurrpa' or 'Water Dreaming'. It is painted in white, red, ochre-yellow and black dot method typical of the Western Desert artists.

The concept of 'Dreaming' is among the most important in Indigenous Australian culture, and combines in one term (that cannot be easily translated into English) knowledge about the timeless prehistoric period of creation, the actions of supernatural beings and ancestors in the world, and the geographical features of the artist's homeland. A dreaming is part history, part theology, part literature and part geography lesson. Here is represented water falling and flowing across the land near Mount Theo.

Several other Warlpiri painters have painted their own interpretations of the 'Water Dreaming', but the works of Lynette Granites Nampijimpa are widely regarded as among the finest of all Indigenous Australian paintings from the later 20th century.

Read more about Water Dreaming.

  • Can you name five women artists?, 'Ngapa Jukurrpa' or 'Water Dreaming' by Lynette Nampijimpa Granites Nelson
    'Ngapa Jukurrpa' or 'Water Dreaming' by Lynette Nampijimpa Granites Nelson

Toula Sykopetritis

These wonderful carnival dance costumes were made by Toula Sykopetritis and worn by her granddaughter, Maria Pieri, in the Limassol carnival in Cyprus.

One represents a bunch of bananas and was made for the 1989 carnival. It includes a pill box-shaped hat with a banana attached. The other costume was made for the 1991 carnival and is shaped like a bunch of pink radishes. There are padded radish shapes in pink fabric stitched to the surface of the body area, with some pieces of green fabric attached to represent foliage.

  • Can you name five women artists?, Dance costumes for Limassol Carnival by Toula Sykopetritis
    Dance costumes for Limassol Carnival by Toula Sykopetritis

Buffy Cordero-Suina

Storytellers are important traditional roles in many Native American societies. This figure, from the Cochiti Pueblo in New Mexico, is a depiction of a Cochiti elder, mouth agape as the story unfolds, with children seated on his legs.

The first Cochiti potter to create a story-teller was Helen Codero, who was at the forefront of the Cochiti artistic revival in the mid-twentieth century. She felt that pottery vessels were not expressive enough of the Cochiti way of life and so began to make figurines of her grandfather and the stories he told, depicting the way in which the oral histories of the Cochiti people bind generations together.

This piece, produced in the early 1990s, was made by her granddaughter Buffy Cordero-Suina, a noted potter who produced many story-tellers.

Following her grandmother's death in 1994, she stopped producing pottery altogether.

  • Can you name five women artists?, Ceramic Storyteller by Buffy Cordero-Suina
    Ceramic Storyteller by Buffy Cordero-Suina

Olive Blackham

This wooden string puppet is painted white with a papier mache headdress highlighted with gold pigment. The puppet wears a costume suggesting a Chinese or Japanese robe embroidered with two cranes, butterflies and flowers. Various strings attach it to a wooden suspension bar.

It was made by Olive Blackham (1899 – 2002) who has been described as a pioneer and a visionary, who elevated puppetry to a high art form. She lived near Birmingham where she set up her own full-time professional Puppet Theatre - The Roel Puppet Theatre – which was very successful.

Read more about Olive Blackham and her Puppet Theatres.

  • Can you name five women artists?, Wooden string puppet by Olive Blackham
    Wooden string puppet by Olive Blackham

Join us throughout the month to share stories of women artists using the hashtag #5WomenArtists on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Redstart Arts Discovery Box

Redstart Arts have been running creative projects at the Horniman for several years. Here, artist Cash Aspeek describes their current work on the Discovery Box project.

Over fifteen different community partners are helping the Horniman create new boxes that will be used by visitors and groups for years to come. They are like mini museums, selecting a group of objects that follow a theme chosen by the group.

Redstart Arts are making their own Discovery Box for the Horniman. The objects the group are choosing are from the Horniman’s Handling Collection as well as handmade objects by the Redstarts (artists with learning disabilities) themselves, made especially for the project.

Redstart Arts’ theme is ‘Protection’.

During the past two years, the Redstarts have become familiar with the Horniman's galleries and many of the objects displayed in them. Each Redstart artist has had been allowed the time and space to select objects that they are particularly drawn to and make studies of them. These objects all had the common theme of protection.

All the sessions for this project involve a group activity where we come together to look at and experience a selection of objects.

Each Redstart is able to connect to different areas of the Horniman's collection and show their interest in the form of drawings, photographs, and conversation, which may come about through storytelling and dramatic scenarios.

The artist educators and Horniman staff are excited with the way the project has developed and are captivated by the incredible focus of the individual Redstart artists. 

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, Kimberly is making objects inspired by shells that create incredible and varied protective environments for sea creatures. Kimberly is using model magic and milliput.
    Kimberly is making objects inspired by shells that create incredible and varied protective environments for sea creatures. Kimberly is using model magic and milliput.

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, Byron is making his own protective mask and talisman pendants working alongside Hannah who is using plaster and modeling materials.
    Byron is making his own protective mask and talisman pendants working alongside Hannah who is using plaster and modeling materials.

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, Uduehi enjoys drawing and is particularly interested in how animals protect their families.
    Uduehi enjoys drawing and is particularly interested in how animals protect their families.

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, David is embroidering images from the Natural History Gallery onto blue satin discs. This will become a protective cloak to be worn. Each disc has a drawing by all the Redstarts.
    David is embroidering images from the Natural History Gallery onto blue satin discs. This will become a protective cloak to be worn. Each disc has a drawing by all the Redstarts.

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, David is embroidering images from the Natural History Gallery onto blue satin discs. This will become a protective cloak to be worn. Each disc has a drawing by all the Redstarts.
    David is embroidering images from the Natural History Gallery onto blue satin discs. This will become a protective cloak to be worn. Each disc has a drawing by all the Redstarts.

  • Redstart Arts Discovery Box, Colleen is designing fabric inspired by African figures. The fabric will be used to protect the Akuaba doll. This doll was given to women to look after as if it were a baby in order to aid their fertility and allow them to be ready for motherhood.
    Colleen is designing fabric inspired by African figures. The fabric will be used to protect the Akuaba doll. This doll was given to women to look after as if it were a baby in order to aid their fertility and allow them to be ready for motherhood.

Volunteer cross-pollination with The Hive

If you think in terms of a year, plant a seed; if in terms of ten years, plant trees, if in terms of 100 years, teach the people. Confucius

My name is Sandra Bogdanova and I have been a volunteer at the Horniman Museum and Gardens since March 2016. As January marks the start of a new year I am extremely happy to share the most memorable trip of our Engage Volunteer Team in December 2016.

  • Volunteer cross-pollination with The Hive, Horniman Museum and Gardens Engage Volunteer Team, Sandra Bogdanova
    Horniman Museum and Gardens Engage Volunteer Team, Sandra Bogdanova

We went to visit The Hive at the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew to understand why plants matter and how The Hive tells the story of the crucial role played by bees. I come from Lithuania, where since time immemorial we have had a bee god called Bubilas and a goddess, Austėja. Growing up surrounded with great respect and mythology about bees made me especially happy about this trip.

Our relationship with the honey bee goes back thousands of years, to the dawn of human history. According to the Collins Beekeeper's Bible, bees represent vital principles and embody the soul. The bee also symbolises the soul that flies away from the body in the Siberian, central Asian and South American traditions. The bee to this day remains the symbol of immortality and eternity, diligence, wealth and kindness.

  • Volunteer cross-pollination with The Hive, Bumblebees at Kew. There are over 270 different types of bees. It is estimated that 90 percent of these bee species are solitary, like bumblebees, but honeybees are communal and live in hives, Sandra Bogdanova
    Bumblebees at Kew. There are over 270 different types of bees. It is estimated that 90 percent of these bee species are solitary, like bumblebees, but honeybees are communal and live in hives, Sandra Bogdanova

There are around 680 volunteers at Kew and 60 of them are volunteer tour guides. They have been given the Queen’s Award for their guiding and have undertaken over 1,600 tours since 1992 when the program started! Volunteer guide Leslie took us on a bee focused tour and he was incredibly patient and knowledgeable. Leslie talked to us about pollination and the two types from flowering plants and coniferous trees. He also told us how insects and birds see a different spectrum of colour to humans, so they notice plants differently to us. It also helps them to see which ones they have visited for pollen.

  • Volunteer cross-pollination with The Hive, Cross-pollination between the Kew and Horniman volunteers, Sandra Bogdanova
    Cross-pollination between the Kew and Horniman volunteers, Sandra Bogdanova

Kew Gardens is over 320 acres. The Broad Walk and The Hive are the two latest areas to be developed with more than 27,000 flowering plants, most relevant to our group because of their relation to bees. We started our tour in the Melon Yard, and then continued to the Alpine Nursery and Scientific Research Nursery. When we came to the wildflower meadow that surrounds The Hive, we got to know that it is made up of 30 different species all of which support honeybees. The meadow is part of the installation too.

Ever since 1851 and The Great Exhibition there have been Expos planned around the world to share knowledge. In 2015, there was an Expo in Milan focused on the theme of Feeding the Planet, Energy for life. This spectacular 17m-tall sculpture formed the centerpiece of the multi-award-winning UK pavilion.

  • Volunteer cross-pollination with The Hive, The Hive was designed to look as though it could be a swarm of bees from afar, Sandra Bogdanova
    The Hive was designed to look as though it could be a swarm of bees from afar, Sandra Bogdanova

It all began when, in search of inspiration, the artist behind The Hive Wolfgang Buttress went to see Martin Bencsik at Nottingham Trent University, who undertakes research into how bees communicate. This planted a seed in Wolfgang’s mind for an installation that celebrated the bee, while immersing the visitor in a sensory experience.

  • Volunteer cross-pollination with The Hive, Horniman Volunteer Coordinator Kate Cooling listening to the vibrations of the Hive, Sandra Bogdanova
    Horniman Volunteer Coordinator Kate Cooling listening to the vibrations of the Hive, Sandra Bogdanova

Bee’s wings beat in a specific pattern (oscillation) which makes the note of C minor and this note is played in The Hive. The floor has hexagonal plates, which echo a real hive and and these vibrate too. There are lights on the walls of The Hive which are lit by the electricity generated from the vibrations.

  • Volunteer cross-pollination with The Hive, These hives at Kew give vibration to the Hive and can be felt on the base of the installation. For the Milan Expo in 2015, they had to run wires underneath the channel to transport the vibrations from the hives in England. The hives at Kew are only a few hundred meters away, so much easier, Sandra Bogdanova
    These hives at Kew give vibration to the Hive and can be felt on the base of the installation. For the Milan Expo in 2015, they had to run wires underneath the channel to transport the vibrations from the hives in England. The hives at Kew are only a few hundred meters away, so much easier, Sandra Bogdanova

The Hive will be at Kew until December 2017.

It goes without saying that it was creative and inspiring, yet unforgettable. As for myself, lately I got enrolled to a beekeeping course with Wimbledon Beekeeping Association and can not put down Steve Benbow‘s book The Urban Beekeeper. A Year of Bees in the City.  I invite you all to visit our Nature Base at the Horniman Museum and Gardens for a closer look at the world of bees.

Wildlife photography - your winner

You voted for your favourite photo from our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition and we reveal the winner...

Our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition was really popular this winter. 

When coming to see the exhibition, visitors were asked to pick which photo was their favourite and leave their comments on a card. 

It was a close call. All of the photographs received at least one vote from the public and there were only a few votes between the top winners. 

We can now exclusively reveal the top three most popular photographs as chosen by our visitors are...

*atmospheric pause*

In third place, the graceful 'Wild European Lynx' by Laurent Geslin.

  • Wildlife photography - your winner, 'Wild European Lynx', Laurent Geslin
    'Wild European Lynx', Laurent Geslin

Here is what some people said about this photograph:

I was drawn to those big eyes and can just imagine him on his long prowls in the night. 

I really like the way the deep sky is captured in the background and how the photographer spent a long time to capture this. 

The contrast, the composition, the elusiveness of the subject. 

In second place, the characterful 'Lightness' by Matteo Lonati. 

  • Wildlife photography - your winner, 'Lightness', Matteo Lonati
    'Lightness', Matteo Lonati

Here is what some people said about this photograph:

It is simple and yet still beautiful.

I like the way the owl is standing to attention like a soldier.

A very arresting photo.

It looks like Hedwig. 

The winner of the public vote is the excellent 'Shadow Walker' by Richard Peters. 

  • Wildlife photography - your winner, 'Shadow Walker', Richard Peters
    'Shadow Walker', Richard Peters

Here is what some people said about this photograph:

It has a beautiful atmosphere.

It reflects the nature in London.

It says so much about the life of the fox - not in shot, he is the hidden king of the urban jungle. 

Because it captures wildlife in an urban setting and reminds us of its presence and beauty. 

Congratulations Richard for winning the public vote as well as the overall competition. 

You can read more about wildlife photography in our interviews with the photographers from this exhibition on our blog

Wildlife photography - your views

Our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition has been very popular this winter, with people of all ages coming to see the 84 extraordinary photographs on display. 

Visitors to the exhibition were invited to fill out a card where they voted for their favourite photo and gave a reason why. 

Next week we will be announcing who came first, second and third in our visitor vote, but until then, here are some of our favourite responses so far: 

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Dragon Duel', Tom Way
    'Dragon Duel', Tom Way

It is brutal, other worldly, ancient, timeless. Somehow both alien and godlike. 

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Lion Love in the Rain', Jon Langeland
    'Lion Love in the Rain', Jon Langeland

The photographer has really captured the lioness's expression and the way the water is spraying is excellent.

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Wink', Ingo Arndt
    'Wink', Ingo Arndt

Extremely flirtatious and seductive, like a Spanish dancer or the seducing dance of tango. 

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Like from a Fairy tale', Giuseppe Bonali
    'Like from a Fairy tale', Giuseppe Bonali

A magical look into a micro world

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Under the water, above the water', Mike Korostelev
    'Under the water, above the water', Mike Korostelev

It tells a story in a really inventive way. Being upside down makes it magical, compelling, mysterious and majestic!

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Alien Sighting', David Burtuleit
    'Alien Sighting', David Burtuleit

Sometimes the things on our doorstep can be the most interesting. 

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Shadow Walker', Richard Peters
    'Shadow Walker', Richard Peters

It connects you somehow with a night story happening next to you that you don't know about. It's just outside. 

  • Wildlife photography - your views, 'Surprised Newt', Pekka Tuuri
    'Surprised Newt', Pekka Tuuri

There are many amazing photos in this exhibition. This one is my favourite because it is a common animal in an amazing situation and it is the only animal with a mohican hairstyle. 

Read our series of interviews with the photogrpahers from this exhibition on our blog

Send us your own wildlife photography by tagging your photos #horniman on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. 

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