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Soundmaps and Spectograms in the Horniman Gardens

Last week, the Horniman's Youth Panel took to the Gardens to create a sound map inspired by Bernie Krause's recordings of animal orchestras from around the world.

We started off the session with a sneak preview of the Great Animal Orchestra exhibition, which opened at the Horniman on Sunday.

Then we headed outside, tasked with discovering the quietest spot in the Horniman Gardens. The challenge? To see if we could find anywhere where you could hear only natural sounds, and nothing manmade.

Using their knowledge of the Gardens, the Youth panel picked the spots where we might have the best chance, sticking to the Northern side of the Gardens in order to keep away from the noise of London's busy South Circular road.

The first stop was next to the Animal Walk, where the Horniman's Pygmy Goats certainly created a lot of noise, but since these are domesticated animals, was this natural? In any case, there was quite a bit of manmade noise here, from planes flying over to people picnicking.

Many of the Youth Panel chose to record the sounds by drawing a visual representation, taking inspiration from Great Animal Orchestra, where the pitches of different animal noises are displayed in a colourful 'spectogram'.

How would you record the pitch and volume of a bleating goat?

We moved on to the South Downs, creating a 'sound circle' (there was a collective groan) and sitting in silence for 3 minutes to carefully listen and record for any sounds around us.

Beth, our Youth Coordinator, may have been distracted by an overly-friendly moth.

Lots of natural sounds on the South Downs, but they were still overpowered by the noise of traffic an particularly sirens in the distance.

Next stop was the Meadow Field, the quietest place so far.

Another discussion struck up - was the noise of a ring-necked parakeet natural? The consensus was no, since it was an introduced species.

Our last stop was in the far north corner of the Gardens, tucked away by the end of the Nature Trail. The unanimous decision was that this was the quietest place to be found in the Gardens, provided you didn't catch a particularly rowdy game of football in the old boating pond.

By the end of the evening we had quite a collection of hand drawn spectograms, each representing 3 minutes of sound.

Youth can see the full collection of spectograms in the Youth Panel's Flickr album.

Some people may have got a bit carried away with spectogramming.

Some members decided to record the sounds we heard in each spot. Here are Nick's recordings:









Thanks to the Youth Panel for helping us create our own Horniman Sound Map and spectograms.