[Skip to content] [Skip to main navigation] [Skip to user navigation] [Skip to global search] [Accessibility information] [Contact us]

Previous Next
of 73 items

About the Art: Ross Hoddinott

As part of our ongoing series on the work of photographers featured in our BWPA exhibition, we met Ross Hoddinott who looks for beauty in the less obvious places.

Can you tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition?

I love springtime and spend as much time as I can exploring the countryside close to my north Cornish home at this time of year looking for close-up subjects. The hedgerows and banks are full of new plant-life during April and May and uncurling ferns look fascinating and beautiful at high magnification. Hart’s-tongue ferns are particularly photogenic and when I noticed these two ferns creating a heart shape when aligned together I couldn’t resist shooting them.

  • 04.41_BOTANICAL_P_609.6_x_406.4_1171709178_HR, 'Hartstongue Heart' appears in the 'Botanical' category of this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards, Ross Hoddinott
    'Hartstongue Heart' appears in the 'Botanical' category of this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards, Ross Hoddinott

How did you go about getting that shot?

I used a dedicated macro lens – optimised for close focus – to enable me to capture a frame-filling shot. I opted for a large aperture of f/4.8 to create a shallow zone of focus. A tripod helped me to carefully compose the image and fine-tune my focusing.

How long did you have to wait for this shot?

I probably spent around 30 minutes fine-tuning the image, experimenting with settings, and perfecting the composition. I had to carefully remove various bits of dead foliage and debris to ensure the fern’s background was clean and attractive. Background choice is always an important consideration.

Did you use any particular equipment or software?

My 200mm Nikkor macro lens is a great choice for this type of close-up and a tripod proved essential too. Otherwise, my set-up was relatively simple for this image.

  • Wingtips, 'Wingtips' is the winner of the 'Close to Nature' category in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards., Ross Hoddinott
    'Wingtips' is the winner of the 'Close to Nature' category in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards., Ross Hoddinott

What are your favourite scenes, species, or motivations behind your photographs?

I specialise in landscape and close-up photography, with a real passion for insects and wild flowers. Dragonflies, damselflies, and butterflies are among my favourite close-up subjects. Highlighting the beauty and form of less obvious or appealing subjects is always a motivation for me.

What are the difficulties of wildlife and nature photography that you face?

The unpredictability of nature and the weather are the most obvious challenges. With the great popularity and accessibility of photography today it is also getting increasingly difficult to produce truly original or innovative work.

  • Banded_Demoiselle-9637, Banded Demoiselle, Ross Hoddinott
    Banded Demoiselle, Ross Hoddinott

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

I’d like to help heighten their appreciation and passion for the landscape, nature, and the great outdoors. Hopefully this – in turn – will encourage a connection with nature and conservation.

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started?

I’ve been a professional landscape and natural history photographer since my late teens – 20 years now. I began shooting wildlife at the age of 11 and never considered anything else as a profession. I’m fortunate to make my living from something I find so fulfilling and rewarding.

  • RHO_Common_blue_damselfly-2614, Common Blue Damselfly, Ross Hoddinott
    Common Blue Damselfly, Ross Hoddinott

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife or nature in their local environment?

Get to know your subject intimately – for example, its habitat, diet, and behaviour. Spend time observing and enjoying your subject – a good understanding and passion for your subject is essential if you wish to capture its character or beauty.

What projects are you working on now or have coming up?

I’ve just finished writing two new books – ‘Masters of Landscape Photography’, published by Ammonite Press and on sale now, and also “Landscape Photography – From Dawn to Dusk’ which is due to be published next Spring – again by Ammonite. It’s been a hectic year – I’m hoping to have more time behind a camera in 2018.

  • Wood_Anemone-6370, Wood Anemone, Ross Hoddinott
    Wood Anemone, Ross Hoddinott

About the Art: Duncan Eames

We spoke to Duncan Eames about his amusing photograph from this year's exhibition of the British Wildlife Photography Awards in which a jackdaw provides a stag with some fashion advice.

Can you tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition?

I try to document the rut in Richmond Park every year since I’ve started my photography hobby– I’ve only missed one due to a broken camera (I broke it while setting up for the rut three weeks after I’d purchased it). Last year’s self-imposed rut assignment was deer with anything on their heads be it flora or fauna.

My wife and I were watching this particular stag having a good thrash while sheltering from the rain. He eventually seemed satisfied with his efforts and settled for what you see in the photo which wasn’t as impressive as most of the others around that day. Soon after a Jackdaw flew in and landed on his back. Although I did notice that it was a little special, at the time I didn’t spot the apparent eye contact between the two until much later. I like to think the Jackdaw was giving the stag some fashion advice.

  • What do You Mean "it Does't Suit Me?", 'What do You Mean "it Does't Suit Me?"' which features in the 'Behaviour' category of this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards, Duncan Eames
    'What do You Mean "it Does't Suit Me?"' which features in the 'Behaviour' category of this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards, Duncan Eames

How did you go about getting that shot?

I wish I could say I was waiting patiently for hours and there was meticulous planning beforehand but it wasn’t anything like that. I just happened to be sheltering from the worst of the rain while trying to protect the camera with a rain cover on the way to having a much-needed coffee. It just so happened that this stag was thrashing about in the grass between resting and a bit of bolving (roaring) - probably part of the reason for choosing the tree for cover. I think we were just about to move on, so I’m glad we actually stayed a little longer.

How long did you have to wait for this shot?

Not long at all. From the moment we had sheltered to the shot probably about 10-15 minutes.

  • Defiant Roar, This is one of my best-known photos. It taken in October 2013 and used in the BBC Wildlife magazine in their 50th-anniversary edition, and their How to Photograph Wildlife special.  , Duncan Eames
    This is one of my best-known photos. It taken in October 2013 and used in the BBC Wildlife magazine in their 50th-anniversary edition, and their How to Photograph Wildlife special. , Duncan Eames

Did you use any particular equipment or software?

I used a Nikon D810 with a 500mm f4 lens on a Gitzo Tripod with a lensmaster gimbal head. I actually had the wrong white balance set as I was experimenting with a manual setting that worked before the cloud and rain came in. This was corrected in Lightroom along with cropping (the original was in portrait orientation) and sharpening.

I had the aperture set to f/5.6, in hindsight I probably would have set the aperture to f/8 or more but I am really pleased with how this came out.

What are your favourite scenes, species or motivations behind your photographs?

I wouldn’t say I have any favourite species or scenes as such. Given most of my well known work are Red Deer photos; I’d have to say one of my favourites has to be the rut in Richmond Park. The sounds, smells and the sight of the deer and the park keep drawing me back.

One of my main motivations for wildlife photography is that I find it is a great way to relieve stress. I couldn’t just watch wildlife all the time, so the camera comes too.

What are the difficulties of wildlife and nature photography that you face?

One is Time. Currently, I’m lucky to get out once a month as real life takes over. So any photo opportunities other than small walks that have been tagged on the end or before shopping trips have been few and far between. I haven’t had much chance to get around some of the better wildlife sites around town for a while either. Sometimes, because I haven’t been consistent with my trips I forget about camera set up or technique (technical and field craft) so it can take me a while to get back into the swing of things. Likewise, my time for processing the photos can be limited. I usually have a couple of hours to process the images. I’m still trying to work out a way to process that works for me.

I currently don’t drive so getting to certain places is harder. I try to turn this into a positive and concentrate on the more accessible places and the wildlife around me.

  • Fieldfare, This Fieldfare photo was one of the first photos I felt that I got right with my first DSLR and long zoom lens. (Nikon D80 and Sigma 150-500mm). Taken in the first big snow of 2010, I took a snow day off from work. I still remember phoning in while up to my knees in snow while on my local patch. , Duncan Eames
    This Fieldfare photo was one of the first photos I felt that I got right with my first DSLR and long zoom lens. (Nikon D80 and Sigma 150-500mm). Taken in the first big snow of 2010, I took a snow day off from work. I still remember phoning in while up to my knees in snow while on my local patch. , Duncan Eames

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

To be honest I’ve not really thought about this, other than that I hope they enjoy what I have to show. As I have mentioned in the previous question, I currently try to document what is around me. A lot of the wildlife around us is taken for granted so I hope that people also find the native nature as interesting as I do.

With regards to the photo in the exhibition, I hope the interaction between the Red Deer and the Jackdaw raises a smile.

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started?

I started with wildlife photography in about 2009 when I purchased a telephoto zoom lens a few years after I got my first DSLR. I blame my wife and the Polish countryside around where she grew up as a more recent catalyst as I wanted to document what I found around there.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife or nature in their local environment?

When it comes to equipment you do not need to spend lots of money. Just because you don’t have the big, heavy, shiny kit doesn’t mean you won’t take good photographs. Choose the right camera make that suits you. It’s no good if you don’t like how it’s balanced or how the controls are laid out. If you can, spend the money on the lenses over the camera body. Unless you have more cash than you know what to do with you are likely to be sticking with one make. If you are also considering stabilisation, ensure that you pick the best tripod your budget will allow. This should be as high as lenses on your list of equipment. Don’t make the same mistake I did or you’ll end up buying another tripod later.

Just get out there and take photos. Practice will mean your photos get better regardless of what you’re trying to achieve be it something creative or just a decent record shot.

There are plenty of places to practice be it urban, coastal, or countryside. For animals and birds, an ideal place to start is in a local park as they are likely to be used to people. I have found that ducks, other waterfowl, and garden birds are very good to start with. Don’t just rush in or get too close. If you can get level with or lower than your subject it can give a better shot. Sometimes sit back and watch the behaviour you can learn a lot and apply it to the photography.

Experiment with your technique, try and emulate others and put your own spin on it. Share your photos and get feedback, post them online or join a camera club. Learn from your mistakes and from others.

  • hedgehog, This is one of the five hedgehogs that visited my garden over the summer. I was laying in wait for it to snuffle its way through the plants at the back of the garden. It heard the camera going and paused for a while (it stayed like this for the time I took the photos). I stopped after five minutes and walked away. To be honest this was the bravest of all the five hedgehogs and after this would walk around me and eat right next to me if there was hedgehog food out for the â which there often was.  It never seemed to mind the camera and often appeared to pose for me. , Duncan Eames
    This is one of the five hedgehogs that visited my garden over the summer. I was laying in wait for it to snuffle its way through the plants at the back of the garden. It heard the camera going and paused for a while (it stayed like this for the time I took the photos). I stopped after five minutes and walked away. To be honest this was the bravest of all the five hedgehogs and after this would walk around me and eat right next to me if there was hedgehog food out for the â which there often was. It never seemed to mind the camera and often appeared to pose for me. , Duncan Eames

What projects are you working on now or have coming up?

I don’t tend to plan photo projects too much as real life gets in the way. It's not that I don’t have ideas, it’s more whether I get the opportunity to carry them out. At some point, I think I may have to change my outlook on taking photos and concentrate more on getting the subject and its habitat rather than the close-up portrait.

Over the last few years, I have occasionally thought about the Wagtail roosts around my town, it might be a good opportunity to have a go with them. One site and probably the best roost around the town happens to be on private land so I’ll have to ask permission. As the area is very busy and usually with far too many people I’m not sure they will allow me.

Next year I hope that I can document the hedgehogs visiting the garden. I had five this year and they seemed to tolerate me being close. Sadly none of them have stayed despite my best efforts to make them feel at home with food, shelter and a section of my garden that is less attended to than the rest. If they do come back, I may even be allowed a trail camera or two to help me document them. If I get the right camera there could be live streaming.

I have repeatedly promised to go and photograph the Peregrines at Charing Cross Hospital in London when I’m in the area and I have always been carried away with other things and then not going. If I mention this here I have no excuse but to visit now.

About the Art: Paula Cooper

We spoke to Paula Cooper as part of our blog series looking at the work of photographers featured in our British Wildlife Photography Awards exhibition and found out why she got up close and personal with a snail for her award-winning shot.

Can you tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition?

'Web of Life' was taken on a very foggy autumn morning. Originally I was after tree shots in Thetford forest but the fog was so dense you couldn't see the trees. Luckily after looking a bit closer up I found this little snail.

  • Web of Life, 'Web of Life' which was chosen as the winner of the 'Black and White' category in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards., Paula Cooper
    'Web of Life' which was chosen as the winner of the 'Black and White' category in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards., Paula Cooper

How did you go about getting that shot?

I didn't have a tripod with me so had to shoot handheld and also had to wait for the fogging on the lens to clear. I had to angle it so that snail was looking up to the cobweb which was covered in water droplets.

How long did you have to wait for this shot?

I only had to wait a few minutes watching the snail move around the plant stem and managed to get the one image of it in the perfect position. I did have a few with a little woodlouse in there too but unfortunately, it wasn't so keen on posing.

  • Bluebell wood  by Paula Cooper, Bluebell Wood, Paula Cooper
    Bluebell Wood, Paula Cooper

Did you use any particular equipment or software?

I shot this using my Panasonic Lumix G7 with a 14-140mm lens at 140mm. I edited it in Lightroom and Silver Effex.

What are your favourite scenes, species, or motivations behind your photographs?

I do most of my photography in Thetford Forest or the surrounding Breckland area when out walking my dogs. I also enjoy getting up to the North Norfolk coast or into Suffolk. I just love the peace and quiet of being out on my own so tend to pick the quieter areas to avoid distractions. One of my favourite things is to photograph the herds of ponies in the Wildlife Trust reserves.

  • Inquisitive  by Paula Cooper, Inquisitve, Paula Cooper
    Inquisitve, Paula Cooper

What are the difficulties of wildlife and nature photography that you face?

My main difficulty is the fact that all the wildlife disappears if I have my dogs with me. I tend to do more nature than wildlife unless it is things like snails and butterflies that are not bothered by the dogs.

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

I like to bring out the personalities of the animals I photograph to bring something more to the images. I also do a lot of creative photography using intentional camera movement and in-camera multiple exposures. These images make the viewer think more about the subject than a straightforward one.

  • Oyster catchers  by Paula Cooper, Oyster Catchers, Paula Cooper
    Oyster Catchers, Paula Cooper

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started?

I bought my first camera (converted to infrared) about 8 years ago but didn't really do much with it for another few years. I finally bought another camera to do colour with about four years ago and have been playing around with different types of photography since then.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife or nature in their local environment?

I would advise getting a camera that you are going to find easy to carry with you, such as the mirrorless that I use. It is no good having a very expensive camera that is too heavy to carry very far. Also to stop and take in what is around you, you might not see an image straight away but keep looking.

  • Waves of light  by Paula Cooper, Waves of Light, Paula Cooper
    Waves of Light, Paula Cooper

What projects are you working on now or have coming up?

Currently, I am adding to a project I started last winter, with all the images taken with the same viewpoint at Lynford Lake but using intentional camera movement to create very different looking images. I will also be doing some indoor photography in the colder weather using decomposing leaves as the subject matter.

  • Autumn leaves  by Paula Cooper, Autumn Leaves, Paula Cooper
    Autumn Leaves, Paula Cooper

About the Art: Paul Colley

In our ongoing series looking at the work of photographers featured in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards, we spoke to Paul Colley about the innovative ways he's captured life underwater.

Can you tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition?

Keen to document the beautiful fish that live in British chalk streams, I set up a two-year project to photograph different species, particularly trout and grayling.  I think that the grayling is a much under-appreciated subject but, like most freshwater fish, it is very shy and difficult to approach with traditional underwater cameras which are handheld by the diver/photographer.  So I developed some remote control underwater cameras that I could control from a distance without disturbing the fish.  In this image, the grayling was chasing insect larvae but the small minnows often fall prey to trout living in the same habitat so they take no chances.  When a bigger fish moves quickly towards them they assume the worst and dive for cover.  So it looks as though they are fleeing from the grayling but its chase is phony.

  • The Phoney Chase, Paul Colley's 'The Phoney Chase' which appears in the 'Behaviour' category in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards., Paul Colley
    Paul Colley's 'The Phoney Chase' which appears in the 'Behaviour' category in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards., Paul Colley

How did you go about getting that shot?

This is a subject that needs endless patience to capture the right moment.  With underwater photography, you have to be very close to your subject to achieve useful contrast, colour, and detail.  So I used a very wide angle fisheye lens and waited until the fish made a pass only inches from the camera before taking the shot.  I was hidden from view on the river bank but could see the action through my laptop, to which I had engineered a live video feed and an ability to change camera settings without getting into the water.

  • Paul Coley1, The River Colne. A typical environment that Paul likes to work in., Paul Colley
    The River Colne. A typical environment that Paul likes to work in., Paul Colley

How long did you have to wait for this shot?

In total it took nearly two years to complete camera development work and get this quality of image.  It then took a few weeks of dedicated effort to get the shot and on the day it took about four hours waiting for the right moment.

Did you use any particular equipment or software?

The camera was housed in a special underwater housing that I had designed just for this project.  The key function was an ability to feed a live picture to a remote laptop and to fully control the camera using hard and soft keys, which I did with Nikon’s commercial camera control software.  The housing had other functions that allowed me to control remote Nikon speedlights essential to bring back the light that is so often lost at even a few inches below the water surface.

  • Paul Colley 3, Grayling at camera. In underwater photography, you need to get fish this close to the camera to get sharp images, Paul Colley
    Grayling at camera. In underwater photography, you need to get fish this close to the camera to get sharp images, Paul Colley

What are your favourite scenes, species or motivations behind your photographs?

Although I’m an underwater photography specialist who dives worldwide, mainly to help ocean conservation agencies, I’m increasingly interested in British wildlife and have started a number of projects to capture images of difficult subjects, which I want to be very different from traditional approaches.  I love wide angle photography in my ocean work and I’m very interested in sharks because of the huge threats that they are now under.  Conservation of our rivers, lakes, and oceans is certainly a big motivator for me and I try to make my images count by working with high-achieving organisations like the Blue Marine Foundation, Fauna and Flora International, and The Wild Trout Trust.

  • Paul colley 4, Swan split level. Paul likes to photograph anything in or around water and took the opportunity to provide a new perspective on this Mute Swan.  It was shortlisted for the British Wildlife Photography Awards, Paul Colley
    Swan split level. Paul likes to photograph anything in or around water and took the opportunity to provide a new perspective on this Mute Swan. It was shortlisted for the British Wildlife Photography Awards, Paul Colley

What are the difficulties of wildlife and nature photography that you face?

The most interesting subjects are often the most difficult to photograph so it needs a disciplined and imaginative, technical approach to achieve your artistic vision.  I can spend up to a year developing a new approach and in that time there may be no good images taken, it’s very frustrating, but sticking to your vision and toughing it out, including many long hours spent in the field, usually yields success.

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

I would like people to appreciate the extraordinary diversity and beauty of wildlife and to be motivated to help sustain the environments that are under threat but which these creatures depend upon.

  • Paul Colley 5, Shake your tail feather. Another example of eschewing the traditional approach. This female Mallard duck looks far more interesting when photographed high key from behind using a slow shutter speed. It nicely caught the preening action and was another BWPA short list image this year, Paul Colley
    Shake your tail feather. Another example of eschewing the traditional approach. This female Mallard duck looks far more interesting when photographed high key from behind using a slow shutter speed. It nicely caught the preening action and was another BWPA short list image this year, Paul Colley

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started?

My professional history goes back nearly thirty years when I used a wet film SLR as part of my previous career, but I’ve only been doing serious wildlife photography as a business for the last few years.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife or nature in their local environment?

Before you even think about cameras and all the technical requirements, study your subject’s behaviour and study it until you understand it intimately.  You can and should take opportunity shots but the photographer who knows their subject will be in the right place at the right time ten times more often than the photographer who just looks for opportunities without real study or planning, it makes such a difference.

  • Paul Colley 6, Paul has now moved onto a new project to photograph bats - a very challenging subject. He naturally prefers those that hunt on and above water, in this case, a Daubenton Bat. He hopes to show the world some remarkable new images of bats sometime next year. , Paul Colley
    Paul has now moved onto a new project to photograph bats - a very challenging subject. He naturally prefers those that hunt on and above water, in this case, a Daubenton Bat. He hopes to show the world some remarkable new images of bats sometime next year. , Paul Colley

What projects are you working on now or have coming up?

My current project is bat photography in a way that nobody else has done it. Bats are protected species, so I’ve taken advice from the Bat Conservation Trust and Natural England, from which I’ve designed and built specialist new low light camera systems including a camera and infrared light system that is invisible to the bats. So I’m currently trying to create some unique new images of British bats. The project is ten months old and although I will need some more work next year when the bats come back out of their winter torpor I’m well advanced with this work and soon hope to show the world some exciting new pictures. 

  • Paul Colley 2, Paul on the riverbank. The beauty of a remote control underwater camera: you can keep dry, do less damage to the environment, and avoid spooking skittish fish., Paul Colley
    Paul on the riverbank. The beauty of a remote control underwater camera: you can keep dry, do less damage to the environment, and avoid spooking skittish fish., Paul Colley

About the Art: Jeremy Moore

As we continue our blog series on the work of photographers featured in the British Wildlife Awards, Jeremy Moore tells us about how his work with landscapes helps him stand out from the crowd when it comes to bird photography.

Can you tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition?

At the time I was working on an exhibition and book project of my own. The exhibition was called 'Bird/land' and has shown several times in Welsh art galleries in the last couple of years. The book is due to be published next year.

I had heard that quite large numbers of hawfinches were found around one town in north Wales, and outside the breeding season fed in one garden in particular. Through my contacts in the British Trust for Ornithology I spoke to the owners of the garden and arranged a visit. I didn’t want to photograph the hawfinches at bird feeders but noticed that they tended to perch in nearby trees or shrubs for a few seconds before going in to feed. I realised my best bet was to wait until spring when a nearby flowering cherry would be blooming. Its flowers and leaves would then form an attractive setting for the birds. It was a long and nerve-racking delay. Cold northerly winds throughout April held back spring for a couple of weeks. Would the birds still be visiting the garden when spring eventually came?

How did you go about getting that shot?

Once spring did arrive, in early May, it came and went very quickly. I set myself up in the garden on a camping chair with a pull-over hide. My camera/lens was set up on a tripod pointing at the cherry tree just waiting for birds to turn up, which fortunately they did, several times. It was quite frustrating sometimes because I could hear hawfinches all around me but not see them until they landed in the cherry.

How long did you have to wait for this shot?

Initially for several months, waiting for the right time of year. Then I visited the garden twice, for several hours each time.

  • Jeremy Moore birdland 49- cherry tree (small), Bird/land 49: Hawfinch image (centre) as seen in triptych format in "Cherry Tree",  from Bird/land exhibition., Jeremy Moore
    Bird/land 49: Hawfinch image (centre) as seen in triptych format in "Cherry Tree", from Bird/land exhibition., Jeremy Moore

Did you use any particular equipment or software?

For bird photography (like most wildlife) a long telephoto lens is almost obligatory, and a camera with a reasonably fast frame rate. A tripod is very useful in a “set-up” situation like this. It would be very difficult to hand-hold your gear for hours at a time otherwise. I have used Adobe Lightroom for processing for the last ten years.

What are your favourite scenes, species or motivations behind your photographs?

I have been a landscape photographer and bird-watcher for many years. I gradually realised it would make sense to combine both my interests. There are many excellent bird photographers around but the aim usually seems to be to remove as far as possible any landscape background. My long history in landscape photography enables me to portray birds in their settings in a way that most bird photographers miss. I try to give the bird and the landscape equal billing, if I can put it that way.

  • Jeremy Moore birdland 1 - avocet (small), Bird/land 1: Avocets - triptych also from Bird/land exhibition., Jeremy Moore
    Bird/land 1: Avocets - triptych also from Bird/land exhibition., Jeremy Moore

What are the difficulties of wildlife and nature photography that you face?

Poor weather, unpredictable subjects, difficulty of making a living from one’s work, competition from many other excellent photographers, lack of exposure outside Wales.

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

Enjoy the beauty of nature but remember we are all responsible for its survival.

  • Jeremy Moore birdland 36 - mallard (small) , Bird/land 36: Mallard - single image from Bird/land exhibition, Jeremy Moore
    Bird/land 36: Mallard - single image from Bird/land exhibition, Jeremy Moore

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started?

I have been landscape/nature photographer for many years. I started with an exhibition and a set of postcards. The latter (Wild Wales/Cymru Wyllt) are now in their 31st year and are sold all over Wales. Several books of my photographers have been published since then, and I have regularly exhibited my work in Wales.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife or nature in their local environment?

Learn as much as you can about your subjects. I am often surprised, for example, at how little some bird photographers know about birds.

  • Birdland 53 (small) - hawfinch, Bird/land 53: Hawfinch - single image of hawfinch in Bird/land exhibition, Jeremy Moore
    Bird/land 53: Hawfinch - single image of hawfinch in Bird/land exhibition, Jeremy Moore

What projects are you working on now or have coming up?

I have been working on a book about wildlife and wild places in Wales for several years. It now has a publication date of autumn 2018. I continue to photograph landscapes for my postcards.

About the Art: Ed Phillips

We spoke to British Wildlife Photography Awards' photographer, Ed Phillips, about bees, springtails and getting up close with your local environment.

Can you tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition?

We are fortunate in having very sandy soils in our garden. This attracts several species of mining-bees every year. I undertake to record and photograph all the bee species that visit or nest in the garden and have a particular interest in the solitary bee species.

  • About the Art: Ed Phillips, Nomada Cuckoo-bee holding-on with its mandibles whilst "roosting" on a Stachys leaf, Ed Phillips
    Nomada Cuckoo-bee holding-on with its mandibles whilst "roosting" on a Stachys leaf, Ed Phillips

Many bees have particular cuckoo-bees that parasitise their nests. Some of the mining-bee species’ nests are attacked by Nomada cuckoo-bees like the one in the photograph. They enter the nest hole when the host bee is away and then lay their own eggs in the provisioned brood cells there. They don’t need to prepare their own nest burrows or to collect pollen and nectar to provision them.

Female mining-bees often “roost” in their holes during the night or when the weather is unsuitable for flying. Cuckoo-bees don’t have a home of their own and can sometimes be found roosting on plants. Often they hang-on with their mandibles; as in the photo. I’m always on the lookout for this, but have only seen it a few times. The males of various solitary bee species can also be seen doing this sometimes.

How did you go about getting that shot?

  • About the Art: Ed Phillips, I do most of my invertebrate photography in our Staffordshire garden. I suspect that's because I'm lazy, but I say it's to know my patch (taken to the ultimate degree!). I have an interest in the solitary bee species and one of the garden shots shows some of the bees I've photographed there. This summer, I also found a Stelis phaeoptera cuckoo-bee in the garden. First county record since 1948!, Ed Phillips
    I do most of my invertebrate photography in our Staffordshire garden. I suspect that's because I'm lazy, but I say it's to know my patch (taken to the ultimate degree!). I have an interest in the solitary bee species and one of the garden shots shows some of the bees I've photographed there. This summer, I also found a Stelis phaeoptera cuckoo-bee in the garden. First county record since 1948!, Ed Phillips

I get up fairly early and invariably have a tour around the garden looking for insects and other invertebrates. It’s a good time to find potential photographic subjects that haven’t warmed-up yet. They are generally more sluggish and less inclined to fly away or scamper off when they are cold! I found this cuckoo-bee in our front garden handing from a Stachys leaf.

Because the bee was inactive, I didn’t (like often happens), have to rush the shot. I was able to position my camera/flash assembly on a bean-bag, lie down on the garden and get a good side-on shot.

  • About the Art: Ed Phillips, A female Osmia leaiana mason-bee, photographed in her nest hole in the garden. Shortlisted in BWPA but not selected., Ed Phillips
    A female Osmia leaiana mason-bee, photographed in her nest hole in the garden. Shortlisted in BWPA but not selected., Ed Phillips

How long did you have to wait for this shot?

It’s been about five years since I last saw this; so quite a wait! Interestingly though, this was one of three separate individuals that I found hanging from the same Stachys plant that week. All different Nomada species too.

Did you use any particular equipment or software?

  • About the Art: Ed Phillips, This is my regular setup for invertebrates, showing flash diffusers., Ed Phillips
    This is my regular setup for invertebrates, showing flash diffusers., Ed Phillips

Virtually all my photography involves macro work of some sort. I used a Canon DSLR and invariably, my favourite macro lens is attached. This is a specialist lens; the Canon MP-E 65mm F/2.8 Macro. It extends from 1:1 to 5:1 magnification.

It had no focussing mechanism, so focus is achieved by moving the whole camera assembly forwards and backwards. I prefer this method though, even for other macro lenses that have auto-focussing. I have a specialist twin-light flash too, that attaches to the front of the lens.

I run all my images through Adobe Lightroom initially. This allows me to make adjustments to the colour balance, overall lighting and exposure. I will then have made final changes in Photoshop Elements. This will just have involved cropping and the removal of sensor dust spots. Within the rules of the BWPA competition, other editing is not allowed.

  • About the Art: Ed Phillips, This is the setup I use for very small invertebrates like springtails. Gives ~8x magnification., Ed Phillips
    This is the setup I use for very small invertebrates like springtails. Gives ~8x magnification., Ed Phillips

What are your favourite scenes, species or motivations behind your photographs?

Initially, I just wanted to record and photograph invertebrates that I encountered in the garden. I was a late starter to this type of photography (not until my mid-60s) and decided to concentrate initially on solitary bees and wasps. I’m still not very adventurous when it comes to finding new locations. Much of my photography is within a few miles of home. That does help you to know your patch though!

When the solitary bees and wasps are no longer active, I have another interest (my wife would call it an obsession); photographing springtails. These present a further challenge because of their small size. The ones I’m particularly interested in - the globular springtails - are generally less than 1mm long. It’s hard photographing subjects that you cannot see with the naked eye.

  • About the Art: Ed Phillips, A female aquatic springtail (Sminthurides aquaticus) by our garden pond. She is less than 1mm long. She is holding a saliva droplet. This is used for grooming. Shortlisted in BWPA but not selected., Ed Phillips
    A female aquatic springtail (Sminthurides aquaticus) by our garden pond. She is less than 1mm long. She is holding a saliva droplet. This is used for grooming. Shortlisted in BWPA but not selected., Ed Phillips

What are the difficulties of wildlife and nature photography that you face?

Well, there are the usual difficulties associated with invertebrates. They’re generally small, active and challenging to find. It’s not possible to identify the majority of our invertebrates from photographs. With some of the commoner species though this is possible and I always like to get a name for my subjects!

Because of invertebrate diversity, I enjoy just having a few insect types to concentrate on. This enables me to better understand their particular habitats and behaviours and to develop the required field-craft. I just wish I’d started all this a little earlier in life!

  • About the Art: Ed Phillips, Field Digger Wasp (Mellinus arvensis) with fly prey. They use paralysed flies to provision their nest holes. This shot in the garden, where we have lots nesting., Ed Phillips
    Field Digger Wasp (Mellinus arvensis) with fly prey. They use paralysed flies to provision their nest holes. This shot in the garden, where we have lots nesting., Ed Phillips

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

I love introducing people to types and species that they didn’t know existed before. It’s given me so much satisfaction and it’s lovely to see other people intrigued by the “hidden” wildlife around us all. Lots of people are surprised to know that we have around 270 species of bee in the UK and that there can be thousands of springtails per square metre of soil and leaf-litter.

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started?

I’ve had a camera since my late teens, but most of what I did was (like most people) holiday and family snaps. I did have a major career change in my 50s when I set-up a small photography business to supplement my main income. As I got nearer to retirement, I reduced activity in my main job and did more photography. I do little commercial photography now; preferring to do my wildlife stuff.

That all really started when I saw a mason bee sealing its nest hole with chewed leaves. The hole was in the wall of our previous house. I didn’t know what it was and that led me into searches though insect books and online. Fortunately, I then got introduced to Steven Falk who lived close to me. He has since produced (together with illustrator Richard Lewington) the wonderful Field Guide to the Bees of Great Britain and Ireland. The guide was long overdue. The previous concise UK bee guide was written in the 1890s! Steven has been a mentor and an inspiration to me.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife or nature in their local environment?

Well first of all, get to know your local environment. Whether you’re photographing, out with binoculars or just walking, there will be lots to see. The more you look the more you find. I think that what really motivated me initially was finding a group of insects (the solitary bees) that really fascinated me. But there’s so much really; trees and wild flowers, fungi, birds. Look at other people’s work for inspiration.

  • About the Art: Ed Phillips, Starling feeding a juvenile. Once again, a garden shot. Submitted to BWPA but not shortlisted., Ed Phillips
    Starling feeding a juvenile. Once again, a garden shot. Submitted to BWPA but not shortlisted., Ed Phillips

What projects are you working on now or have coming up?

The autumn and winter is sorted; springtails. Because so few people look for them (although there is considerable work being undertaken in neighbouring Shropshire to complete a county springtail atlas), there are always interesting things turning up.

Last month, I managed to find a previously-undescribed species in the garden of a local stately home. At the same location, I found a species that hadn’t been recorded in the county for 100 years!

I’ll be on the lookout for images for the 2018 BWPA too!

About the Art: David Tipling

We heard from British Wildlife Photography Awards' photographer David Tipling about his photograph, "Crowded Beach."

Can you tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition?

I photograph this seal colony regularly throughout the year as it is only a couple of miles from where I live. I am always looking for new angles to illustrate the seals.

I took aerials on a number of occasions over the space of a month.

  • David Tipling photography, David Tipling
    , David Tipling

What are your favourite scenes, species or motivations behind your photographs?

I specialise largely in birds as that is what I became well known for 25 years ago when I turned professional.

My main motivation for being a professional wildlife photographer is lifestyle, being able to be out in the wilds following my passion for creating artistic pictures of nature rather than simply nicely lit portraits.

  • David Tipling photography, David Tipling
    , David Tipling

What are the difficulties of wildlife and nature photography that you face?

It is always challenging coming up with new ideas.

The biggest difficulty now is being able to make sensible living because of the competition in the market place. With over supply comes falling fees and a general devaluation in photographs.

  • David Tipling photography, David Tipling
    , David Tipling

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

The aim is always to try and make them go, "Wow!"

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started?

I have been taking pictures of wildlife for 40 years but a pro for 25.

  • David Tipling photography, David Tipling
    , David Tipling

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife or nature in their local environment?

Perseverance.

What projects are you working on now or have coming up?

Current project is picture editing and shooting pictures for a book on eagles of the world. My next book a Bird Photographer’s Diaries was published in early December just in time for Christmas.

  • David Tipling photography, David Tipling
    , David Tipling

About the Art: Drew Buckley

British Wildlife Photography Awards' photographer, Drew Buckley talks to us about getting a good shot in an extreme location.

  • Photographs of hares by Drew Buckley, Kingdom of the Hare, Drew Buckley
    Kingdom of the Hare, Drew Buckley

Can you tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition?

I took this image on a trip to Scotland last winter. High up in the western Cairngorms is one of the best place to witness these hardy creatures going about their business. It was an exceptionally cold and windy day and photographing in these conditions was tough.

I started off shooting handheld with a super telephoto with the gusts blowing the lens hood around, meaning even photographing a static animal was tricky. Being able to see became an issue too with the powdered snow stinging my face in the wind, not to mention the lens hood was filling up with snow every few minutes and coating the lens, which needed wiping.

It's probably one of the harshest weathers I've photographed in, however wholly satisfying and totally rewarding.

  • Photographs of hares by Drew Buckley, Drew Buckley
    , Drew Buckley

How did you go about getting that shot?

From being solely focused looking uphill at the hare, after turning around and seeing the vast landscape behind me, I thought I have to include this!

First challenge was to change lenses from the 500mm to the 24-70mm without covering the camera internals in snow, then to move around to a position above the Hare so as to shoot back into the mountainous backdrop finding a pleasing composition.

  • Photographs of hares by Drew Buckley, Drew Buckley
    , Drew Buckley

With the wind blasting across the hillside, the clouds were really shifting across the scene and I must have shot over 50 images, all slightly different as the sun went in and out of the clouds, finally settling on this one as I prefer the subtle lighting on the hills and colours in the sky.

How long did you have to wait for this shot?

As with any good wildlife photography, you need to be accepted into their world and to get the best shots. Ultimately you want them relaxed and behaving naturally.

To gain the animal's trust you need you need to spend plenty of time with them, for instance I spent around three hours with this individual, gradually moving closer and checking it was content with me before proceeding. Over time the hare completely accepted me and was happy with my presence. Treat them with respect and they will reward you with a great insight into their world.

  • Photographs of hares by Drew Buckley, Drew Buckley
    , Drew Buckley

Did you use any particular equipment or software?

Not really, just lots of layers of clothing, digital SLR and lens.

What are your favourite scenes, species or motivations behind your photographs?

Creating eye-catching imagery but keeping it natural is what makes me tick.

In recent years, I've definitely started shooting more 'habitat' images, where the landscape is as much part of the shot as the subject species is, this example is probably one of favourites.

  • Photographs of hares by Drew Buckley, Drew Buckley
    , Drew Buckley

What are the difficulties of wildlife and nature photography that you face?

Finding the right setting is always an important aspect, as is having a cooperative subject.

So, in most cases I'll work with the familiar species such as garden birds or woodland mammals, and of course my favourite seabirds - Puffins - which I spend a lot of time with in the summer months on my local island of Skomer.

  • Photographs of hares by Drew Buckley, Drew Buckley
    , Drew Buckley

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

I guess the right answer is to be inspired but I can't say that's my objective from the outset. I've always fundamentally photographed for myself and if others like it too, or take inspiration from it, then that's a very humbling feeling.

  • Photographs of hares by Drew Buckley, Drew Buckley
    , Drew Buckley

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started?

I've been a full time professional for seven years now, before that I was a very enthusiastic amateur that stemmed from an early age thanks to brotherly influences. Both had SLR cameras and that sowed the seed in the early 90s.

  • Photographs of hares by Drew Buckley, Drew Buckley
    , Drew Buckley

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife or nature in their local environment?

Definitely start local. Think about composition; the light is very important and how you can tie it up in a creative manner. I find these images much more interesting that exotic shots from far flung destinations.

  • Photographs of hares by Drew Buckley, Drew Buckley
    , Drew Buckley

What projects are you working on now or have coming up?

Early in 2018 should see the launch of my third book, Photographing South Wales published by FotoVUE. It has been my project now for more than 3 years working on visiting locations and writing all the text to go with each viewpoint. FotoVUE are making some superb photo location and visitor guidebooks for an ever growing list of locations and I was privileged to be asked to cover my 'patch' back in 2014.

The journey over this time has made me fall even more in love with my home country and showcases the diversity South Wales offers everyone throughout the year. I've tried to select a good variety of photographic subjects in this book, so whether you are looking for coast or beach views, river valleys, upland rambles or castles, then the end result, is a book that will hopefully help and inspire others on their photographic journey through South Wales.

As well as my South Wales book, I'm also working on many other publications to be released in 2018 and into 2019.

About the Art: Jan Galko

In our latest blog post focusing on photographers featured in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards, we spoke to Jan Galko about his work.

Can you tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition?

For this particular shot, I just went out as usual with my camera ready. This picture was taken at one of my favourite local places - the River Anton near Andover. I was fascinated by a pair of swans that were building a nest, fiercely protecting any potential invaders. The wire stretched across the river meant that not all of the chased intruders escaped unscathed. As I was born in central Europe the barbed wire is somehow symbolic for me.

  • The Last Song by Jan Galko, Jan Galko's 'The Last Song' features in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards in the 'Close to Nature' category, Jan Galko
    Jan Galko's 'The Last Song' features in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards in the 'Close to Nature' category, Jan Galko

Did you use any particular equipment or software?

Camera Nikon D7100. Lens Sigma 150- 500mm. Photoshop. A pair of wellies. 

What are your favourite scenes, species or motivations behind your photographs?

I have not got a fixed idea as to what I am going to photograph when I leave the house. I am always prepared to be surprised and am grateful for little opportunities that offer themselves to me. The basic criteria for a good photo is good light and composition. But to really feel happy, the photo needs to have a meaning.

  • Autumn above Anton lake, Jan Galko
    , Jan Galko

What are the difficulties of wildlife and nature photography that you face?

Juggling between my day job and my hobby proves quite difficult at times. I try to seize every moment I have and go out with a camera. Other than that, I also find frustrating the boundaries created by private land. Just as everything is coming together; I have the subject, the perfect light, all I need is to tweak the angle or come a bit closer and the big private sign gets in the way. To set the record straight, so far I have always stayed within the law.

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

I think, just as with any other form of art, I would like people to come away having discovered something new for themselves. That all that they need to do is to look around them as there is a wealth of beauty all around us.

  • The touch of the sun, Jan Galko
    , Jan Galko

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started?

My background is in the fine arts, with a particular interest in landscape painting. My passion for photography only really came into with the introduction of digital colour photography.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife or nature in their local environment?

Patience.

What projects are you working on now or have coming up?

One of my dreams is to capture the misty atmosphere - there is a picture that I painted in my mind: the perfect moment when the balance between sun and condensation in the air results in a myriad of colours and only lasts for a few seconds. This is my next challenge.
Other than that, I enjoy taking pictures of other photographers at work - peculiar creatures, contortionist aren't they?

About the Art: Wendy Ball

In our latest blog post focusing on photographers featured in this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards, we spoke to Wendy Ball about finding the perfect shot in the Arctic or even in your back garden.

Can you tell us the story behind your photo in this exhibition?

Although we have a large variety of birds visiting my feeders in the garden, visits from Sparrowhawks are rare. As I was about to leave home I saw this Sparrowhawk endeavouring to fly with this freshly killed Collared Dove. After unlocking the door of the house, running upstairs, attaching my camera and lens I fully expected the bird to have vanished. However, it was still there trying to fly off with the Collared Dove. I was able to capture this image before it finally left with its prize. Sometimes you need a great spoonful of luck.

  • Murder in the Garden, Wendy Ball's 'Murder in the Garden' is featured in the 'Urban' category of this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards on display at the Horniman, Wendy Ball
    Wendy Ball's 'Murder in the Garden' is featured in the 'Urban' category of this year's British Wildlife Photography Awards on display at the Horniman, Wendy Ball

Did you use any particular equipment or software?

The equipment I used was a Canon 5D Mark 111 and 100-400mm lens, handheld.

What are your favourite scenes, species or motivations behind your photographs?

I find that I am not only fascinated by principally wildlife but the wider picture of landscapes, the minutiae of macro as well as everything in between. It has enhanced my perception of the world around us and made me very aware of the environment, wildlife, and the ever-changing light.

  • Polar Bear, As we anchored off the atmospheric remote island of Karl X11-Oya, in the Svalbard archipelago, a female polar bear was spotted on the cliffs scouring a kittiwake colony. For me, my images transport me back to the occasion of their capture. I can hear the cries of the kittiwakes, the gentle sound of the water, cracking and popping of the ice and the breath of an apex predator., Wendy Ball
    As we anchored off the atmospheric remote island of Karl X11-Oya, in the Svalbard archipelago, a female polar bear was spotted on the cliffs scouring a kittiwake colony. For me, my images transport me back to the occasion of their capture. I can hear the cries of the kittiwakes, the gentle sound of the water, cracking and popping of the ice and the breath of an apex predator., Wendy Ball

What are the difficulties of wildlife and nature photography that you face?

I suppose one of the main difficulties that I face is the lack of time. I would love to be able to spend more time adding to the already amazing bank of wildlife experiences that I have shared with my husband. There are many, many more places and wildlife to see and experience, and time is becoming increasingly more precious. As our knowledge increases, I find there is so much more to learn, not only about photography but about the species that I am capturing and the wonderful world we live in.

For example, I was taking pictures of solitary bees that were establishing nest sites in our garden. Another rather different looking bee was in the vicinity, so I took pictures of it. Later, using the photos as ID, I found out that it was a cuckoo bee of the leaf cutter bees that I had been observing.
On another occasion, I found that one of the Bumblebees had parasites that were clearly seen in the photos - again something that would have passed me by. You learn something new every day.

  • Walruses, These two Walrus were lying on a floating ice platform in Svalbard. These animals forage on the sea floor, searching and identifying prey, principally bivalve mollusks such as clams, with its sensitive whiskers and clearing the sediment with jets of water and active flipper movements.  The walrus sucks the meat out by sealing its powerful lips to the clam and withdrawing its tongue rapidly into its mouth, creating a vacuum., Wendy Ball
    These two Walrus were lying on a floating ice platform in Svalbard. These animals forage on the sea floor, searching and identifying prey, principally bivalve mollusks such as clams, with its sensitive whiskers and clearing the sediment with jets of water and active flipper movements. The walrus sucks the meat out by sealing its powerful lips to the clam and withdrawing its tongue rapidly into its mouth, creating a vacuum., Wendy Ball

What would you like people to think about when they see your work?

For me, the joy of taking photographs is that it has taken me to places in the world that I would never have visited otherwise. I have been very lucky that my husband and I have the same sense of values, love of the outdoors and wildlife, and have been able to enjoy the same hobbies together. It is wonderful that other people get a taste of these things through our photographs. My photographs have been a great learning tool too. As a former teacher they provoked many questions, excitement, and wonderment of the world. The fact that I could relate the tales behind the images as first-hand experiences definitely brought them alive in quite a unique and personal way. This has also applied to friends and family too.

  • Arctic Fox cubs, Arctic Foxes are able to survive in the harshest environments due to the quality of their fur providing insulation and by building up their fat reserves in the autumn, sometimes increasing their body weight by more than 50%. This provides greater insulation during the winter and a source of energy when food is scarce. We have watched them on several occasions predating on Kittiwake colonies taking birds and eggs and caching them in dens.  These two cubs were fighting over a kittiwake wing.  The photo was taken hand held from a small zodiac close to the shore., Wendy Ball
    Arctic Foxes are able to survive in the harshest environments due to the quality of their fur providing insulation and by building up their fat reserves in the autumn, sometimes increasing their body weight by more than 50%. This provides greater insulation during the winter and a source of energy when food is scarce. We have watched them on several occasions predating on Kittiwake colonies taking birds and eggs and caching them in dens. These two cubs were fighting over a kittiwake wing. The photo was taken hand held from a small zodiac close to the shore., Wendy Ball

How long have you been a photographer and how did you get started?

My father was a keen photographer and I was fascinated as a young child to see images emerging like magic from blank paper. I began taking photos myself in order to record family life and family holidays. With the luxury of more time when I retired, it became a natural progression to take photography more seriously and it became a steep learning curve in order to take more imaginative images and to progress from ‘record shots’ to aesthetically pleasing images. This steep learning curve has not diminished - it is increasing. Primarily I take photographs for my own purposes and enjoyment. For me, they transport me back to the sight, sound, and feeling of the location where they were taken. Increasingly more people have taken an interest and gained enjoyment from my photographs. It is lovely to be able to share them with a wider audience.

What would you advise someone wanting to start taking photos of wildlife or nature in their local environment?

Firstly, do not underestimate your immediate locality. My image that achieved a Highly Commended in the 2016 British Wildlife photography awards is a good example. Many of my images have been taken in our small garden which is located in a village on the South Downs. I have attracted a lot of wildlife into the garden by setting up bird feeders and a regular supply of water. I have two water features in the garden with running water. Both have attracted wildlife such as birds, frogs, snails, and newts. An old Belfast sink had seven newts breeding in it this last year which was fascinating to see. I have grown many pollen-rich plants for bees and butterflies. I purchase a colony of Bumblebees each year which the family finds fascinating to watch. We also have a large cedar tree in the garden and erected a Tawny Owl nest box which is sited so that it is visible from the bedroom windows. To our delight, it has been used for the last two years and enabled us to witness the development of the young owlets.

  • Mouse in the compost bin_60A4196, I had noticed that there had been some disturbance in the compost bin in our garden.  After observing at a distance using the car as a hide, I discovered that some mice were foraging amongst the discarded vegetable matter.  So I set up my camera on a tripod at the side of the car and waited.  Eventually, the mice reappeared and continued with their foraging.  During the course of three or four days, I continued to photograph them, gradually moving closer.  By keeping very still the mice accepted and appeared totally unaware of my presence, and some even began caching food in the flower bed adjacent to my feet.  It was fascinating to watch their antics and the interaction and personality of some of the individuals.  It is a good example of nature on your doorstep., Wendy Ball
    I had noticed that there had been some disturbance in the compost bin in our garden. After observing at a distance using the car as a hide, I discovered that some mice were foraging amongst the discarded vegetable matter. So I set up my camera on a tripod at the side of the car and waited. Eventually, the mice reappeared and continued with their foraging. During the course of three or four days, I continued to photograph them, gradually moving closer. By keeping very still the mice accepted and appeared totally unaware of my presence, and some even began caching food in the flower bed adjacent to my feet. It was fascinating to watch their antics and the interaction and personality of some of the individuals. It is a good example of nature on your doorstep., Wendy Ball

What projects are you working on now or have coming up?

On a local level, I am baiting an old post in our garden to hopefully attract the Tawny Owl in order for me to take photos using techniques that I am learning at present. I am applying these techniques to foxes that are visiting the garden too. I discovered they were visiting the garden on a regular basis by setting up a couple of trail cameras. This year I want to experiment with trying to capture the newt activity using underwater photography.

On a wider front, we have two major projects planned for next year. The first is a trip to Canada to photograph Snowy Owls. This will present quite a few challenges working in an extremely cold environment. We have worked in the cold before in Finland, Norway and Svalbard.
The second involves underwater photography which will be a new venture for us. We will be snorkelling with Whale Sharks, Manta Rays and hopefully Humpbacks on the Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia.

  • Wendy Ball IMG_0631, Wendy Ball
    , Wendy Ball

Previous Next
of 73 items