423.213

Russian bassoon, maple, brass mounts, brass lined sockets. Three brass keys. Dragon's head bell of brass, decorated in green and gold, with red and gold band and edging. A flaw in the wood by the right hand key cover has been filled. Lacks crook and mouthpiece. Keys lack pads. Stamped: 'Tabard Lyon'.

Russian bassoon, maple, brass mounts, brass lined sockets. Three brass keys. Dragon's head bell of brass, decorated in green and gold, with red and gold band and edging. A flaw in the wood by the right hand key cover has been filled. Lacks crook and mouthpiece. Stamped: 'Tabard Lyon'.

The Russian bassoon is an upright serpent which was mainly produced in Lyons for continental military bands. Its most arresting feature is its dragon's head bell, the sight of which Adam Carse considered might have been even more intimidating to the enemy than the sound it made. Like other serpents, it is played with a deep, cup-shaped mouthpiece.

The Russian bassoon is an upright serpent which was mainly produced in Lyons for continental military bands. Its most arresting feature is its dragon's head bell, the sight of which Adam Carse considered might have been even more intimidating to the enemy than the sound it made. Like other serpents, it is played with a deep, cup-shaped mouthpiece.

Collection Information

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