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422.112 (Single) reedpipes with double (or quadruple) reeds with conical bore

Oboe, boxwood, without mounts. Three keys (swallow-tail C and duplicated D sharp), flat, round, brass, mounted in turned rings. Twin holes for third and fourth fingers. Sounding length (length overall) is 59.6 cm. Bell badly split, some chipping of bell rim. Middle joint tenon chipped externally. Stamped: T. Stanesby (Star mark).

Oboe. Nominal pitch: C. Boxwood, without ferrules, brass keyword. Three joints with onion-shaped baluster. Three keys (fishtail C and duplicated D sharp), flat, round, mounted in turned rings. Twin holes for third and fourth holes. Bell badly split, some chipping of bell rim. Middle joint tenon chipped externally. Stamped: T. Stanesby (Star mark).

The keywork on three-keyed oboes was designed to allow the player to choose whether to hold the instrument with the right or left hand uppermost. The placement of the left hand in the uppermost position, seen in two-keyed oboes dating from the mid-18th century, became standard on woodwinds.

Oboe, boxwood, without mounts. Three keys (swallow-tail C and duplicated D sharp), flat, round, brass, mounted in turned rings. Twin holes for third and fourth fingers. Sounding length (length overall) is 59.6 cm. Bell badly split, some chipping of bell rim. Middle joint tenon chipped externally. Stamped: T. Stanesby (Star mark).

The keywork on three-keyed oboes was designed to allow the player to choose whether to hold the instrument with the right or left hand uppermost. The placement of the left hand in the uppermost position, seen in two-keyed oboes dating from the mid-18th century, became standard on woodwinds.

Collection Information

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