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321.321

Lute
Tenor lute. Nine double courses of strings and one single course. The body is constructed of fifteen maple ribs. The table is of pine pierced by a geometrical rose. The strings are attached to rosewood pegs which enter the angled pegbox from the sides, and at their lower ends, to a bridge glued to the table. Four frets are glued to the table. Labelled 'Arnold Dolmetsch / 1893'.

Tenor lute. Nine double courses of strings and one single course. The body is constructed of fifteen maple ribs. The table is of pine pierced by a geometrical rose. The strings are attached to rosewood pegs which enter the angled pegbox from the sides, and at their lower ends, to a bridge glued to the table. Four frets are glued to the table. Labelled 'Arnold Dolmetsch / 1893'.

Tenor lute, labelled 'Arnold Dolmetsch / 1893'. The body of the lute is constructed of fifteen maple ribs. The table is of pine pierced by a geometrical rose. There are nine double courses of strings and one single course. The strings are attached to rosewood pegs which enter the angled pegbox from the sides, and at their lower ends, to a bridge glued to the belly. Four frets are glued to the table.

This lute is obliquely referred to in a correspondence between Dolmetsch and James Joyce. In 1904, the writer wanted a lute so that he could travel along the south coast, singing English songs. Unfortunately, Dolmetsch lacked Joyce's enthusiasm: he explained to Joyce that he made a lute some years previously but would be unlikely to make another. Dolmetsch also warned Joyce that the lute was difficult to play and keep in tune. Dolmetsch made this lute while living in West Dulwich. He continued to make replicas of historic instruments well into the twentieth century.

Collection Information

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