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Exploring (Ancient) Egypt

Lucy Maycock, Schools Learning Officer tells us how exploring archaeological sites led to the reimagining of the Ancient Egypt workshop.

Over summer, I had the fantastic opportunity to travel to Egypt and spent a fortnight exploring both famous and lesser-known archaeological sites. Like many, I have always been fascinated by the Ancient Egyptians and was completely astonished by the wealth of ancient temples, tombs, and complexes open to tourists.

As a Schools Learning Officer, I spend most of my time using our Handling Collection to teach visiting school groups about a wide range of topics. One of our most popular workshops is ‘Ancient Egypt’, in which pupils handle real Ancient Egyptian objects. Despite its popularity, the session had remained largely unchanged for many years so, inspired by my visit, we decided it was time for a revamp.

Egyptologist Samir Abbass, my tour guide and owner of Real Egypt, kindly examined photographs of our handling objects and was able to provide us with more information about them: giving us a better idea of the people who may have used them; clarifying how they were used; and was even able to translate hieroglyphics for us.

With this in-depth knowledge, we were able to create a schools session that gives pupils the chance to actively examine objects, working in teams to solve questions about the former use and meaning of one or two artefacts. The teams then join together and have the opportunity to share their conclusions, using their objects and findings to safely send someone to the Afterlife.

It’s lovely to see the enthusiasm that the new session inspires in pupils. Objects are now hidden in boxes which the children unpack, creating a real sense of curiosity and awe. It brings a new found focus that was sometimes missing from the old version of the workshop.

We’ve had brilliant feedback from teachers and pupils about the new format. One teacher commented that "the session is so much more exciting for the children, it’s really involved and it helps them to make sense of the objects." We love teaching it too, and hope to inspire some archaeologists of the future!

We’re now looking at some of our other long-standing, popular sessions and thinking about how we can encourage pupils to investigate and explore objects in a similarly active and thoughtful way. Watch this space!

Make and Take Puppet workshops reimagined

Shayna, Schools Learning Officer tells us how she put a fresh approach on the Horniman’s Make and Take a Puppet workshop.

The workshop

My name is Shayna and I’m one of the Schools Learning Officers here at the Horniman. Some 31,000 school pupils take part in taught workshops at the Museum and Gardens each year. The Make and Take a Puppet workshop is a favourite with Key Stage 1 in the colder months.

We start by looking at and trying out some of the Horniman's Sanchar rod puppets from India. Pupils are challenged to guess the secret ingredient in the papier-mâché heads – fenugreek (a curry spice). Their answers range from cinnamon to bacon crisps! Next, I tell the Indian story of Rupa the Elephant by Mickey Patel, with its morals of self-acceptance, diversity and kindness. I encourage pupils to remember these values during the craft activity – making rod puppets to take away.

  • Indian Sanchar rod puppet, Indian Sanchar rod puppet
    Indian Sanchar rod puppet

The revamp

Although the workshop was popular with schools, the team felt it was a little prescriptive and relied too heavily on unsustainable materials. So I set about a revamp. First, I found sustainable alternatives for the materials without increasing the cost – scrunched up newspaper instead of polystyrene balls for the heads; masking tape instead of sticky tape; cotton instead of synthetic felt. The sequins had to go too.

Fabric was the trickiest to source but eventually, we managed to secure a supply of used white cotton napkins (washed, of course) from textile recycling firm LMB. To jazz these up I introduced Indian block printing, which teaches pupils a new skill and links to the Indian heritage of the rod puppets at the start of the workshop.

  • Key stage 1 using stamps, Key Stage 1 using stamps
    Key Stage 1 using stamps

To make the workshop less repetitive, pupils are now given a choice between four different animal faces and feet for their puppets – tiger, leopard, elephant or peacock. To add some differentiation, the feet can be cut out in two different ways to cater for different levels of dexterity.

  • Child making paper rod puppet, Child making paper rod puppet
    Child making paper rod puppet

I wanted to add one premium item to enable pupils to personalise their puppets. I knew I’d found it when I came across some beautiful animal-print Washi tape. It’s great to see how creative the children are with just a small piece of this – fashioning it into a collar or even a bandana or bow.

As a final flourish and a nod to the fenugreek earlier, I spray some mixed spice scent onto each puppet. This fills the room with the smell of gingerbread, which is a lovely way to end the session.

  • Animal-print Washi tape, Animal-print Washi tape
    Animal-print Washi tape

The response

The revamped workshop has been well received by pupils, teachers and parents. One teacher mentioned that our shift to sustainable materials tied in with their focus on sustainability in Science. Another teacher, who had done this workshop before, remarked that the block printing has added more skill and creativity to the session. The real seal of approval for me was overhearing a pupil saying, “I can’t wait to play with it!”

Celebrating the arts

Disguise. Layers. Extraordinary and ordinary. Natural and man made. These are just some of the themes that art students come to explore at the Horniman.

  • Drawings by Artsmark students, Drawings by Artsmark students
    Drawings by Artsmark students

Artsmark celebration week ran from 8 – 12 October and is a national celebration of arts and culture. Artsmark is the creative quality standard for schools, accredited by Arts Council England. Artsmark provides a framework for teachers to plan, develop and evaluate arts, culture and creativity across the curriculum.

The Horniman is an Artsmark partner, so we support schools to achieve their Artsmark status and schools can visit us as part of their award.

During Artsmark celebration week, Sacred Heart School from Camberwell brought their year 11 GCSE group to explore the theme of disguise. Luckily we have around 3,000 objects in the handling collection that pupils can touch, photograph and draw to build up their sketchbook as part of their GCSE topic.

  • Drawings by Artsmark students, Drawings by Artsmark students
    Drawings by Artsmark students

We explored camouflage in animals, looking at a zebra skin and stoats that change colour with the time of year. The pupils also looked at textiles, puppets and masks for inspiration for their final piece. As part of their visit, the students also explored the new World Gallery to look for further examples of disguise.

Pupils from Langdon Park Secondary School from Tower Hamlets also visited during this celebration week and their theme was ‘Layers’. Pupils explored clothing, seed pods, gourds and even an armadillo carapace.

We celebrate the arts all year round at the Horniman with handling sessions for schools for art, music, textiles and puppets. Find out more about Artsmark, and Horniman school sessions. Check out more artwork by schools visitors.

  • Drawings by Artsmark students, Drawings by Artsmark students
    Drawings by Artsmark students

Learning with Lucy

In our latest blog post, Lucy Maycock, Schools Learning Officer, at the Horniman reflects on her first few months in the post.

Having now spent two months as Schools Learning Officer here at the Horniman, I thought it might be time to share my early experiences of the role. I was truly delighted when my application for Learning Officer was successful. When I was offered the position, I’d already worked at the Horniman as a Learning Assistant for two-and-a-half years and really couldn’t see myself working anywhere else.

My first half term as a Learning Officer was a little overwhelming. The Schools Team here offer nearly 40 different school sessions on a wide range of topics, from ancient history to biology. With a background in music and humanities, I’ve really loved teaching ‘Ancient Egypt’ and ‘Musical Instruments around the World’. I’ve also been really surprised by how much I’ve enjoyed teaching ‘Prehistoric Britain’. I never learned about the Stone, Bronze, or Iron Age in school, but am now completely fascinated by the skill and ingenuity of people who lived during that time.

The really special thing about teaching at The Horniman is our department’s incredible, 3,000 object-strong Handling Collection. Each object is available for visitors to touch, investigate, and even smell. In our ‘Ancient Egypt’ and ‘Prehistoric Britain’ sessions, children handle real museum objects that are thousands of years old, not to mention the hundred-million-year-old fossils in our 'Evolution' workshop. There’s something incredibly special about empowering children to investigate and discover things for themselves - showing that we trust them to carefully handle such precious objects.

Although the amount of learning that I still have to do is a bit daunting, I’ve been surprised by how much I’m enjoying revisiting and revising topics that I haven’t thought about since school, including animal classification and evolution. I’ve learned so much from watching and talking to my experienced and incredibly patient colleagues and also from the school pupils in my sessions.

Terrifyingly, children and adult helpers really can ask you anything but constantly amaze me with their enthusiasm, ideas, and knowledge.

How big is a crocodile's brain? A Year in Review

As another busy year kicks off the schools team, we look back at the sessions, questions, objects, and activities we have experienced over the last academic year.

Last year, over 30,000 pupils visited for school sessions with an additional 15000 pupils exploring the Museum galleries. We had giant robots, ‘plantastic’ plants, and a huge redevelopment project. But in addition to all of that, school session visitors got to handle real museum objects, to explore them for themselves, and answer and discover questions about these objects.

So how big is a crocodile’s brain? What’s a turtle shell made of? When did people discover fire? Why did the Ancient Egyptians mummify a bird? Which animal in the world has the most teeth? How do butterflies taste with their feet? These are just some of the questions we are asked. We don’t always know the answers, but luckily we have a team of curators to ask for any particularly tricky questions.

In the past year, we introduced new sensory SEND sessions, said goodbye to a fox, won an award, dressed up as jellyfish, and much more. Now after a nice break we're looking forward to next term when we will be meeting some butterflies, visiting new galleries, teaching new sessions, and of course trying to answer more questions.

Book now for a school session next term.

Museum Club wildlife photography

Children from Horniman Primary School come to our Museum once a week for an after-school Museum Club.

Last term they created their own photography inspired by our European Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition.

The children wrote their own labels which explain why they chose the animal and how they decided to photograph it.

Their photographs show a talent for composition. A lot of time was taken to think about the characteristics of the animals they were photographing and how the animals act in their natural habitats. 

Here are a few examples of these artistic photographs. 

'Midsummer Night breeze!' by Maisie 

  • Midsummer Night breeze!, A baby rabbit is called a kit, a female rabbit is called a doe and a male is called a buck. I chose this animal because I want people see what would have happened when the sun goes down. It makes a beautiful contrast with the mouse and the bird. The background makes the animals stand out
, Maisie
    A baby rabbit is called a kit, a female rabbit is called a doe and a male is called a buck. I chose this animal because I want people see what would have happened when the sun goes down. It makes a beautiful contrast with the mouse and the bird. The background makes the animals stand out , Maisie

'ΜΑΎΡΟ ΚΑΙ Ξ†ΣΠΡΟ ΖΩΞ‰Σ' (black and white life) by Sophia

  • Black and White Life, I took this photo of a badger because of its large size and secretive way of living. The background shows the pattern of the badger's fur. Badgers are short-legged omnivores in the family mustelidae, which includes otters, polecats, weasels and wolverines, Sophia
    I took this photo of a badger because of its large size and secretive way of living. The background shows the pattern of the badger's fur. Badgers are short-legged omnivores in the family mustelidae, which includes otters, polecats, weasels and wolverines, Sophia

'Criaturas que Cazan' (hunting creatures) by Rosa and Angel

  • Criaturas que Cazan – hunting creatures, These animals circle in a fight for survival. The stoat, a wonderfully deft animal, edges away from the looming buzzard. We angled it so the elegant bird seems to look disdainfully down upon the lonely stoat, Rosa and Angel
    These animals circle in a fight for survival. The stoat, a wonderfully deft animal, edges away from the looming buzzard. We angled it so the elegant bird seems to look disdainfully down upon the lonely stoat, Rosa and Angel

'Awesome Elster' (awesome magpie) by Lucian

  • Awesome Elster – awesome magpie, I love the Magpie because he has a cute face.  I think he has a serious expression.  The feathers of a magpie are very soft.  Its feet are very small.  I angled it so it's looking you in the eye
, Lucian
    I love the Magpie because he has a cute face. I think he has a serious expression. The feathers of a magpie are very soft. Its feet are very small. I angled it so it's looking you in the eye , Lucian

'The Bird with Blue' by Livvy 

  • The Bird With Blue,  I was looking for an animal, then this one stood out like a shining star. I thought that it would look nice on a blue background. Blue jays are sometimes known to eat eggs or nestlings, and it is this practice that has tarnished their reputation
, Livvy
    I was looking for an animal, then this one stood out like a shining star. I thought that it would look nice on a blue background. Blue jays are sometimes known to eat eggs or nestlings, and it is this practice that has tarnished their reputation , Livvy

'The Semi-Darkness' by Caity

  • The Semi-Darkness , I chose to photograph the mongoose because it is interesting how it looks like a meerkat.  I like how pretty the fur is. I think the animal goes well with the background. I hope you like it too, Caity
    I chose to photograph the mongoose because it is interesting how it looks like a meerkat. I like how pretty the fur is. I think the animal goes well with the background. I hope you like it too, Caity

We had the Museum Club's photographs specially printed and they are now on display in our Education Centre.

Find out more about school sessions at the Horniman

SEND schools programme shortlisted for award

We are very excited that our SEND school programme has been shortlisted for a Museums & Heritage award this year. Here to tell us more about the programme is our Schools Learning Officer, Maria Magill. 

'The question I get asked most is, 'What do you do when you’re not teaching?' Among other things, I get to work on developing our offer for schools, particularly for special educational needs schools. This is one of the most fun aspects of my job.

Our programme of sensory sessions and resources has been shortlisted for a Museums & Heritage Award this year in the category of Education Initiative. The Schools Team couldn’t be more excited!

SEND Sensory Session: A Musical Adventure was developed as part of the legacy of a project with Peoplescape Theatre Company. It is a music session using instruments from Brazil and Nigeria. Pupils help a character ‘Rebecca’ and travel to each country to collect instruments to bring back to the Museum.

Encountering storms on the sea (making wave sounds with our ocean drum), visiting the Brazilian rainforest to be surrounded by butterflies and birds (fluttering tissue paper shapes), and helping to pack a suitcase, as well as learning a Yoruba song of welcome, all form part of this fun session.

SEND Sensory Session: Ancient Egyptian Mummification was developed due to teacher requests. Pupils engage with a sensory story exploring how Mr Horniman collected artefacts from Egypt.

They explore the process of mummification through a range of sensory experiences and objects. They have a go at bandaging, exploring the spices and tools used in mummification (salt, frankincense, cedar oil, beeswax) and handle real Ancient Egyptian objects including a mummy mask.

Alongside the sessions, we’ve worked to make the Museum visit more accessible and inclusive.

There is a social story on our website showing the rooms schools will visit, the things they will see and who they will meet.

We’ve had training to help us incorporate Makaton signing into our sessions and we’ve got software to enable us to create Widgit flashcards as another communication tool.

We’ve had a rethink about how we set up our workshop spaces, changed our tablecloths to make objects easier to see and made cushions available to sit on the floor.

  • SEND schools programme shortlisted for award, Widgit cards
    Widgit cards

Next steps involve creating a new science sensory session linked to our Aquarium and creating a day schedule using Widgit cards which we can share with schools before they visit.

To be shortlisted for a Museum & Heritage Award shows us that we are on the right track, and gives us a renewed burst of enthusiasm to keep improving our offer, making it more accessible for all participants, and to keep improving our professional practice. We’ve just started and we’re excited to keep going!

If you would like to find out more or book a session please contact us at 0208 291 8686 or email schools@horniman.ac.uk.

For more information visit this SEND group page on our website.'

Museum Club: Arts Award Project with Eliot Bank School

The Horniman offers a Museum Club for three different local primary schools. Eliot Bank School’s Museum Club spent last term working towards their Arts Award, Discover level. Learning Assistant, Lucy, writes about the group’s work over the term.

Arts Award encourages children and young people to explore and take part in different art forms, creating a log-book to document their work. The scheme was a perfect fit for our Museum Club format, so we decided to pilot Arts Award with them.

Inspired by both the Horniman’s Festival of Brazil summer season and the beautiful Gardens, we decided to create miniature gardens for the project. Over the course of ten weeks, the group grew their own flowers and herbs from seed with the help of our Gardener, Damien.

  • Museum Club: Arts Award Project with Eliot Bank School, Horniman Gardener, Damien, shows the students how to add plants to their miniature gardens.
    Horniman Gardener, Damien, shows the students how to add plants to their miniature gardens.

Sketching and taking inspiration from the different spaces in the Horniman Gardens, the group designed their own, scavenging for twigs and pebbles to incorporate into their designs.

  • Museum Club: Arts Award Project with Eliot Bank School, Students from Eliot School with their miniature gardens
    Students from Eliot School with their miniature gardens

The Festival of Brazil summer season presented a fantastic opportunity for the group to work with a visiting Brazilian artist to create bandeirinhas (bunting) and to find out about her work, and Brazil, first-hand. They also learnt about Rio’s Selaron Steps, designing patterns and creating colourful mosaics on their plant pots in response.

  • Museum Club: Arts Award Project with Eliot Bank School, Colourful mosaics were added to the plant pots
    Colourful mosaics were added to the plant pots

Finally, Helen our Librarian showed the group one of the Horniman’s rare books: a collection of cyanotypes created by the nineteenth century Botanist and Photographer Anna Atkins. The children were fascinated by her work and loved having the opportunity to see such a special object up-close.

  • Museum Club: Arts Award Project with Eliot Bank School, Students learnt about Brazilian bunting used in festivals, and made some of their own!
    Students learnt about Brazilian bunting used in festivals, and made some of their own!

Having learnt about Atkin’s work and the science behind her cyanotypes, the group created their own (despite the lack of sunshine!) using leaves from the plants they had grown. The following week, the children taught their families and friends how to make cyanotypes, making them together.

  • Museum Club: Arts Award Project with Eliot Bank School, Horniman Librarian, Helen, teaches the students about cyanotypes
    Horniman Librarian, Helen, teaches the students about cyanotypes

Their cyanotypes look fantastic and have contributed to a new book that is being added to the library’s collection!

The group loved taking part in the project, and we received lots of positive feedback from their teachers and families. 

Whilst requiring a lot more staff time than our usual Museum Club programme, the structure of Arts Award worked well for the group, giving them focus, motivation and a log-book to be very proud of. 

Finally, by presenting the group’s certificates in a school assembly, the project has inspired more children to join the club this year!’

Makings Masks

Pupils from Erith Secondary school have been taking part in a project with the Horniman to design and make a mask.

  • African masks that provided inspiration for the students, Photo by Jessica Light
    , Photo by Jessica Light

African masks that provided inspiration for the students

Mrs R King, Head of Art at Erith School said:

"Each year the whole of Year 8 take part in an extended cross-curricular project which seeks to enhance and develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of African art and artefacts, in particular the masks collection."

 

The students' display

This is an exciting trip for the students who spend the whole day at the museum not only viewing the extensive collection, but the students get the chance to handle them as well. Students make sketches in the galleries and handling session and then return to the classroom to develop ideas for designing and making their own masks.

The museum gives the students a unique learning experience which is both thought provoking and informative.

Some fantastic new masks

Back at school one of their tasks is to design and create a mask using inspiration form their visit to the Horniman. Some of these are now on display in the museum’s education centre and also online as part of our schools flickr page.

The school are already planning a repeat visit for next term.

Design and Technology Week at the Horniman

Last week was Design and Technology Week, so, in partnership with STEM London East, Key Stage 3 pupils from schools across London East visited the Horniman to take part in an Olympics-inspired activity.

We asked the pupils to design their own Olympics logo, mascot and products using our Natural History collection and Aquarium as inspiration.

Our Natural History keeper Paolo and Aquarium keepers Jamie and James entertained and amazed students with stories of extraordinary athletes in the natural world. Did you know that a cheetah is as fast as a car on the motorway? If a flea were the size of a human, it could jump straight from the Museum to Forest Hill station?

All the students did a fantastic job, showing a real eye for design and drawing. With the help of a few staff members as judges, the students' work was presented on a mood board, with the following winners selected from each school:

Monday, 25 June - Haberdashers’ Askes’ Hatcham College

First place: Proud

Second place: Team Roo

 

Monday, 25 June - Little Ilford School, Ilford

First place: Sabrina Rocks

Second place: The Incredibles


 

Tuesday, 26 June - Our Lady’s Convent High School, Hackney

First place (tied): Courage the Fox

First place (tied): Synchro


 

Tuesday, 26 June - St. Paul’s Way Trust, Mile End

First place: Gorilla and Frog

Second place: Diverse


 

Friday, 29 June - Eltham Foundation School

First Place: Going 4 Gold

Second Place: Dizzy Doughnuts (Big Cats)


 

Friday, 29 June - The Chafford School, Rainham, Essex

First Place: Peregrine Falcon

Second Place: Ostrich

 

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