321.321 Necked bowl lutes

Charango, lute.

Charango, lute. Pocoata (Pukwata)-type charango. The wooden waisted body with rounded back painted green. The table with palmette inlay at the centre-base and purfling of red, green and brown stained woods; circular sound hole, tension bridge. The wooden finger-board with twelve metal frets. The pegbox with ten rear-entrant pegs for five double courses of wire strings.

In the past the charango was made from an armadillo shell, and the shape of the animal's carapace and head is retained in this example, in the rounded back with triangular shaped projection overlapping the back of the fingerboard. This type of charango, with metal strings is played by the campesinos, subsistence farmers, while the cholos, villagers with connections with the large towns, favour a type with nylon strings. It is played using a strumming technique. The charango is comparatively rare in S. Potosi.

In the past the charango was made from an armadillo shell, and the shape of the animal's carapace and head is retained in this example, in the rounded back with triangular shaped projection overlapping the back of the fingerboard. This type of charango, with metal strings is played by the campesinos, subsistence farmers, while the cholos, villagers with connections with the large towns, favour a type with nylon strings. It is played using a strumming technique. The charango is comparatively rare in S. Potosi.

Collection Information

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