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211.311

Large hide covered frame drum known locally as a Kading. Drum has a jute handle used for carrying the instrument. The drum body is made of wood and provides the resonance while the hide covers the body of the instrument. Glue is used to attach the hide to the drum body.

Kading (Sora language) or tambo (Oriya language), frame drum with a single membrane. The frame is made of a length of wood that is soaked to make it pliable. It is bent into the form of a circle, and the overlapping ends are nailed together. The cowskin head is glued to the shell. A length of jute forms a carrying strap. Made in Gumma, Gajapati district.

The kading frame drum keeps the beat of the music in the tradtional kading-pane Sora dance ensemble. Before the drum is played, the head is warmed in front of a straw fire to make it taut. The thinner of the two playing sticks is held in the left hand and plays a drum roll, whilst the thicker stick is held in the right hand and plays a single beat. Traditionally the kading-pane ensemble was reserved for celebrations honouring the dead, but it now also accompanies dance songs and music at weddings and government-sponsored festivals of the Sora community.

The kading frame drum keeps the beat of the music in the tradtional kading-pane Sora dance ensemble. Before the drum is played, the head is warmed in front of a straw fire to make it taut. The thinner of the two playing sticks is held in the left hand and plays a drum roll, whilst the thicker stick is held in the right hand and plays a single beat. Traditionally the kading-pane ensemble was reserved for celebrations honouring the dead, but it now also accompanies dance songs and music at weddings and government-sponsored festivals of the Sora community.

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