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311.221-5

Stick zither locally called a Jengjurangrai, with bamboo neck, gourd resonator, 5 frets held in place with beeswax, 2 pegs and 2 metal strings. At one end of the neck a piece of cotton (textile) is wrapped around the base of the bridge. Instrument is held and plucked to play music in particular to support the ritualistic Soara songs sung by the instrument player.

Jengjurangrai, jenjurangrai or gogonjenro, stick zither. The string carrier is formed of a bamboo tube with five raised frets fixed with beeswax, and a resonator consisting of two sections of gourd. There are two wire strings tuned to the same note from stick-like pegs and secured to a pointed stringholder that is fixed into the base of the tube. Made in Tame Gorjang in Gajapathi.

The jengjurangrai is held upright when it is played with the resonator pressed against the chest. The strings are plucked with the index and middle fingers of the right hand, or with a plectrum. All four fingers of the left hand stop the strings above or between the frets. Both thumbs rest on the neck to facilitate finger movement. The instrument accompanies Sora ritual songs addressed to the ancestors and to other departed relatives, often sung during the course of events such as healing ceremonies where their assistance is sought. The musician will sing and play simultaneously. Mr Ogadu was taught to make the instrument by his father. He belongs to the Sora community that keeps the traditional faith.

The jengjurangrai is held upright when it is played with the resonator pressed against the chest. The strings are plucked with the index and middle fingers of the right hand, or with a plectrum. All four fingers of the left hand stop the strings above or between the frets. Both thumbs rest on the neck to facilitate finger movement. The instrument accompanies Sora ritual songs addressed to the ancestors and to other departed relatives, often sung during the course of events such as healing ceremonies where their assistance is sought. The musician will sing and play simultaneously. Mr Ogadu was taught to make the instrument by his father. He belongs to the Sora community that keeps the traditional faith.

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