tablet (plaque (ritual & belief: representations))

Slate tablet with relief of Padmasambhava seated on a lotus throne. He is surrounded by a quasi circular aureole which extends behind a flat halo surrounding his head. He holds a vajra in his right hand, raised at his heart and in his left a skull-cup brimming with nectar, containing the vase of longevity that is also filled with the nectar of deathless wisdom and ornamented on top by a wish-fulfilling tree. Tucked under his right arm is the khaṭvāńga staff, an attribute which is intrinsic to the iconographic representation of Padmasambhava.

The reverse of the tablet bears the mantra OM AH HUNG (Body, Speech, Mind) carved in relief. When thangkas undergo the process of rapney or consecration OM AH HUNG is written on the back of the canvas behind the figures depicted. Through this process the image on the thangka becomes the deity it depicts, giving the devotee direct access to the deity.

Slate tablet with relief of Padmasambhava seated on a lotus throne. He is surrounded by a quasi circular aureole which extends behind a flat halo surrounding his head. He holds a vajra in his right hand, raised at his heart and in his left a skull-cup brimming with nectar, containing the vase of longevity that is also filled with the nectar of deathless wisdom and ornamented on top by a wish-fulfilling tree. Tucked under his right arm is the khaṭvāńga staff, an attribute which is intrinsic to the iconographic representation of Padmasambhava. The reverse of the tablet bears the mantra OM AH HUNG (Body, Speech, Mind) carved in relief. When thangkas undergo the process of rapney or consecration OM AH HUNG is written on the back of the canvas behind the figures depicted. Through this process the image on the thangka becomes the deity it depicts, giving the devotee direct access to the deity.

Collection Information

These objects are only a part of our collections, of which there are more than 350,000 objects. This information comes from our collections database. Some of this is incomplete and there may be errors. This part of the website is also still under construction, so there may be some fields repeated or incorrectly formatted information.

The database sometimes uses language taken from historical documents to help research, which may now appear outdated and even offensive. The database also includes information on objects that are considered secret or sacred by some communities.

If you have any further information about objects in our collections or can suggest corrections to our information, please contact us: enquiry@horniman.ac.uk